Five high-profile hotels for spring, from Havana to Stockholm

Which spring hotel openings are worthy of global acclaim? According to Ignacio Maza, the executive vice president of Signature Travel Network, a group of travel agents and hotels, this spring is especially significant when it comes to new accommodations because several highly anticipated hotels are making their debuts. Some, such as the Hotel Eden in Rome and the Gran Hotel Manzana Kempinski La Habana in Havana, were bogged down by multiple delays. “We’re finally going to see these and other big projects that have been in the works for years come to light,” Maza said. 

Below, five properties to consider checking into this spring. 

— Four Seasons Hotel at the Surf Club, Surfside, Florida (Opened in March)  

Notable guests including Winston Churchill and Frank Sinatra visited the Surf Club, just outside of Miami Beach, during its heyday for much of the 20th century. Now, Four Seasons is trying to create a better version of its original glory. Architect Richard Meier is behind the sleek design, which includes 77 guest rooms with floor-to-ceiling windows. Other amenities include three pools, 900 feet of beachfront and standout dining options. Jean Pickard, a travel consultant at SmartFlyer in Atlanta, said that the hotel not only represents the revival of a distinguished property but also speaks to a new direction for Four Seasons. “The brand is moving away from cookie-cutter properties and opening ones with distinctive voices,” she said.  

Nightly rates from $899.  

— At Six, Stockholm (Opened in March)  

With an eye-catching design sensibility that mixes blackened steel and gleaming granite, along with vintage and contemporary furnishings and modern artwork, At Six made a splashy debut in a city where accommodations veer toward the traditional. “Stockholm has been a struggle for travelers looking for a fun, yet polished place to stay,” said Shelby Donley, owner of Camelback Odyssey Travel, a travel consultancy in Phoenix. The property has 343 rooms, and its social spaces, including a restaurant and lounges, are spread out over two floors; it’s on Brunkebergstorg Square, a favorite hangout in the 19th century for the city’s high society.  

Nightly rates from $200.  

— Gran Hotel Manzana Kempinski La Habana, Havana (Opening June 1)  

Cuba’s capital city is lacking in upscale accommodations, but the Gran Hotel Manzana, from the European luxury hospitality group Kempinski Hotels, is set to change that. In the heart of old Havana in the historic Manzana de Gómez building, which was Cuba’s first shopping mall, the hotel will have 246 rooms, a rooftop terrace with a pool, three restaurants and a cigar lounge. Maza said that luxury seekers who were hesitant about visiting Havana because of the limited five-star properties now have no reason not to go.  

Nightly rates from $440.  

— Hotel Eden, Rome (Opened in April)  

We don’t typically include renovated hotels on this list, but the Eden has undergone such a drastic makeover, after an 18-month closure, that it qualifies as new. There are now 98 rooms instead of 121, a new spa and a contemporary aesthetic that seamlessly blends in with the hotel’s original classic Roman style. Maza predicts that La Terrazza, the all-day rooftop brasserie overlooking the city, will be an instant see-and-be-seen spot, and Ms. said that the hotel will “hands down be the most luxurious in Rome.”  

Nightly rates from $668.  

— Grand Velas Los Cabos, Los Cabos, Mexico (Opened in March)  

Los Cabos is saturated with luxury hotels, but the Grand Velas is the first one that’s all-inclusive, Donley said. The 304 ocean-view suites are spacious — a minimum of close to 1,200 square feet — and amenities include five restaurants, an expansive spa, three pools, a contemporary art gallery and a tequila and mezcal bar. The staff-to-guest ratio is three to one. “This is the resort for anyone who wants to relax in an upscale setting without getting nickel-and-dimed for every snack or drink they order,” Donley said.  

Nightly rates from $750 a person; children between the ages of 5 and 17 are $100 each (under 5 are free).

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