Opinion


Letters to the editor: Aug. 14, 2018

Re: Aug. 8 article, “Greg Abbott tweets bogus Winston Churchill quotation about anti-fascists.” Instead of misattributing a quote to Winston Churchill, perhaps Gov. Greg Abbott should have posted: “When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross,” a quote often erroneously attributed to Sinclair Lewis. Either way, considering the state of...


Editorial: Travis County voters must check their ballot’s paper trail

Editorial: Travis County voters must check their ballot’s paper trail

The most critical piece of any election is getting the results right. That simple goal involves highly complex logistics when it comes to voting equipment. Travis County has hundreds of different ballot combinations tailored to voters in different congressional, legislative and local districts, making preprinted paper ballots an unwieldy option — particularly in a county where any voter can...
INSIGHT: Eugenics. Segregation. U.S. universities facing racist pasts

INSIGHT: Eugenics. Segregation. U.S. universities facing racist pasts

The Trump administration recently announced plans to scrap Obama-era guidelines that encouraged universities to consider race as a factor to promote diversity on campus, claiming the guidelines “advocate policy preferences and positions beyond the requirements of the Constitution.” Some university leaders immediately went on the defense. Harvard University stated that it plans to continue...
Letters to the editor: Aug. 13, 2018

Letters to the editor: Aug. 13, 2018

The proposed soccer field should only go forward only after receiving approval of this new neighbor through a District 7 primary vote. District 7 will feel the most impact of the soccer field, both good and bad — namely, the increase in nearby business opportunity and income verses the increase in traffic, lack of parking, more noise and, likely, crime. Only by a primary vote will these District...
TWO VIEWS: Let’s send a ‘red flag’ message to ourselves

TWO VIEWS: Let’s send a ‘red flag’ message to ourselves

What happened? How did we travel from a time of school paper drives, kick ball and May Fetes to a time of school metal detectors, armed teachers and live shooter drills? How did we go from ABCs to AK-47s? Before examining that question, can we acknowledge together the wearying nature of our national “conversation” about guns in America? The Wild West’s famous Gunfight at the OK Corral...

TWO VIEWS: ‘Red flag’ law makes us vulnerable to ‘thought police’

Trending its way through the United States and touted as an answer to the “not one more time” demand, “red flag” legislation provides a dangerous solution to a misdiagnosed problem. So, why all the hype? Americans are still reeling from the horrifying venue shootings this year. They want answers — and they want action. Creative minds have responded with a flood of ideas...
Editorial: CodeNext ballot measure portends big changes in city zoning

Editorial: CodeNext ballot measure portends big changes in city zoning

The demise of CodeNext – made official by the Austin City Council last week — won’t stop a November ballot petition regarding CodeNext and land-use matters, which if passed by voters and sustained by a court, could dramatically change the way the city does zoning in future years. The city might well end up with a system that gives residents significantly more power over land-use...
INSIGHT: Think Confederate markers are racist? Look at pioneer statues

INSIGHT: Think Confederate markers are racist? Look at pioneer statues

In San Francisco, there is an an 800-ton monument that retells California history, from the Spanish missions to American settlement. Several bronze sculptures and relief plaques depict American Indians, white miners, missionaries and settlers. A female figure symbolizing white culture stands atop a massive stone pillar. The design of the “pioneer monument” was celebrated in newspapers...
Commentary: Our Capitol’s plaque lies about history. Let’s remove it

Commentary: Our Capitol’s plaque lies about history. Let’s remove it

It has been a year since a horrific tragedy in Charlottesville, Virginia, caused a loss of life and painfully reminded us that bigotry still exists and needs to be confronted. It was bigotry also — and, a backlash to the Civil Rights movement — that likely motivated state officials to hang a demonstrably false and incendiary plaque in our state Capitol during the late 1950s. We’ve...
Commentary: Texas issues A-F grades for schools Aug. 15

Commentary: Texas issues A-F grades for schools Aug. 15

On Aug. 15, the Texas Education Agency will issue report cards for our schools. We do this for two main reasons: First, parents should know how well our schools are performing, so they can better support their children; second, educators benefit from having clear information about school performance, highlighting successes and challenges, to help improve support for students over time. This year,...
Herman: Churchill and Gov. Greg Abbott together again for the 1st time

Herman: Churchill and Gov. Greg Abbott together again for the 1st time

A half-century after his death, Winston Churchill remains a towering figure worthy of revere (which is kind of odd because Revere once urgently warned his neighbors that people of Churchill’s nationality would be arriving imminently). So revered is Churchill that God continues to see fit to create many babies in Churchill’s image. And Churchill said so much awesome stuff that it&rsquo...
Letters to the editor: Aug. 10, 2018

Letters to the editor: Aug. 10, 2018

Re: Aug. 6 commentary, “Wear: Cap Metro plugs into a new transit outlet: electric-powered buses.” While I applaud Cap Metro for doing something, its move to begin testing electric buses shows how far behind the rest of the world America is in transport technology. The Chinese city of Shenzhen, near Hong Kong, currently operates a fleet of 16,000 buses — all of which are electric...
Herman: The Daughters of the Republic of Texas close down and pack up

Herman: The Daughters of the Republic of Texas close down and pack up

It was a tired museum in a tired building tucked under a freeway in a tired part of town ripe for a reawakening. Ditto, some might say, for the longstanding organization that ran the now-closed museum. The Daughters of the Republic of Texas museum closed July 27 after being on East Anderson Lane, just went of the U.S. 183 and Interstate 35 interchange, since the early 1990s. Everything’s being...
Letters to the editor: Aug. 9, 2018

Letters to the editor: Aug. 9, 2018

Re: Aug. 4 article, “Amid Trump-Koch feud, Abbott talks Texas v. California.” Gov. Greg Abbott, given his long reign as top politico is this one-party state, must be credited for his electoral prowess and devoted partisanship, though his views regarding matters of political economy and social theory are peculiar. His vision of Texas as the “leader of the national movement for capitalism&rdquo...
Commentary: How MLS in Austin can open the door to civic opportunities

Commentary: How MLS in Austin can open the door to civic opportunities

There has been a lot of discussion about the finances involving the MLS soccer deal before the Austin City Council. Is it economically good for Austin? How much are Precourt and MLS paying to Austin? How much low-income housing space is being provided? Who is paying for transportation in and out of the stadium? I have a question to our City Council: Do you know what has been lost in the discussion?...
INSIGHT: Why Alex Jones, or someone like him, will be back

INSIGHT: Why Alex Jones, or someone like him, will be back

Confrontational characters spouting conspiracy theories and promoting fringe ideas have been with us since the invention of American broadcasting. First on radio, then on television, the American audience has consistently proven eager to consume the rants of angry and bitter men. Before Alex Jones and InfoWars, there was Glenn Beck. A decade ago, Beck was hawking his conspiracy theories on HLN and...
Grumet: Girls deserve same perks as boys in Austin’s MLS stadium deal

Grumet: Girls deserve same perks as boys in Austin’s MLS stadium deal

This being 2018 and all, I naturally assumed the girls would share in the perks. But as we found out during last week’s City Council discussion on the proposal to move the Columbus Crew SC to Austin, the largest piece of the community benefits package, an elite youth soccer academy worth $48 million over 25 years, is for boys only. I hope that fact doesn’t sit well with you, either. The...
Commentary: Confederacy groups don’t belong in Veterans Day parades

Commentary: Confederacy groups don’t belong in Veterans Day parades

For about a quarter of a century, the Sons of Confederate Veterans have marched in various patriotic parades in Austin, notably, Austin’s Veterans Day parade. Last year might have been their last march. While grassroots volunteers organize the parade, the city finances it through fee waivers. On Thursday, the Austin City Council will take up a resolution proposed by the veterans organization...
Letters to the editor: Aug. 8, 2018

Letters to the editor: Aug. 8, 2018

Re: Aug. 5 commentary, “Myth, not renewable energy, generates Georgetown’s buzz.” This piece is poorly researched with broad unsubstantiated conclusions and worn-out ultraconservative arguments. If Texas Public Policy Foundation is going to present a rational case, it needs to be well-researched and reflect a firm understanding of the industry and its issues. Cutter W. Gonzá...
Commentary: To help separated families, tap the experts

Commentary: To help separated families, tap the experts

As the Trump administration moves slowly toward reuniting refugee parents and children, we are hearing reunification stories from the front lines. Accounts from families, journalists, activists, political leaders and clinicians tell of the enormous distress that refugee children and parents have endured. A Honduran father reunited with his 3-year-old son after three months said: “He just kept...
Young: Trump cries ‘fake news’ as cybersecurity threats loom

Young: Trump cries ‘fake news’ as cybersecurity threats loom

Ah, fake news. In determining that Russian actors went on a social media disinformation rampage in 2016, analysts cited many markers. One was that bogus pro-Trump, anti-Hillary posts featured “language patterns that indicate non-native English and consistent mistranslation” of our language, according to the Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensic Research Lab. Not to throw anyone off...
Editorial: CodeNext’s suspension is a chance to rebuild public trust

Editorial: CodeNext’s suspension is a chance to rebuild public trust

For some time, much of the public has been aware of CodeNext’s faults. But, like doting parents who make excuses for their children’s misbehavior, most of the Austin City Council brushed aside its flaws, as well as the jumbled way the zoning rewrite was rolled out and sold to residents. It was Mayor Steve Adler, a supporter of CodeNext, who removed the council majority’s rose-colored...
Herman: Rough look of columns in Slaughter overpass at MoPac temporary

Herman: Rough look of columns in Slaughter overpass at MoPac temporary

Today, I give you something for which nobody has been clamoring: a columnist’s column columnizing about columns. This isn’t my fault. You can blame American-Statesman reader and curious South Austinite Suzanne LaPinta. (And I’m aware that some North Austinites think all South Austinites are “curious.”) LaPinta saw something that caught her eye, and she turned to me for...
INSIGHT: Desperate HIV patients in Venezuela turn to homemade remedies

INSIGHT: Desperate HIV patients in Venezuela turn to homemade remedies

When Jesus Eduardo Rodriguez could no longer find his life-saving HIV medicine in Venezuela, a country where everything from chicken to aspirin is in short supply, he turned to Google about a month ago looking for hope. What he found were stories about a Brazilian doctor using a plant called bay cedar, or guasimo, to treat his HIV-positive patients. Out of options, Rodriguez started self-medicating...
INSIGHT: How nonprofits handle the fallout from taking ‘blood money’

INSIGHT: How nonprofits handle the fallout from taking ‘blood money’

The activist group Prescription Addiction Intervention Now, or PAIN, is organizing protests across the country at museums like the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Sackler wing in New York City, Washington’s Arthur M. Sackler Gallery and the Harvard Art Museums. These protesters aim to pressure the Sackler family, which amassed a fortune after founding Purdue Pharma – the drugmaker that...
Letters to the editor: Aug. 7, 2018

Letters to the editor: Aug. 7, 2018

Re: Aug. 1 commentary, “How America can birth a just and loving world.” I was deeply moved by midwife Paula Rojas’ stunning analogy of the current horrific refugee situation to a difficult childbirth. She says our country is in the middle of a difficult labor. We still have a long way to go — and it will get more intense before the birth comes. As with any labor, we must remember...
Facebook comments: Aug. 7, 2018

Facebook comments: Aug. 7, 2018

The American-Statesman editorial board recently commented on the Bastrop County sheriff’s operation that resulted in the arrest of 28 people —16 of them picked up by immigration authorities for deportation proceedings. The board wrote, “Documents leave little doubt that Bastrop County Sheriff Maurice Cook’s ‘zero tolerance’ traffic sweep in June was a thin guise...
Facebook comments: Aug. 5, 2018

Facebook comments: Aug. 5, 2018

As reported by the American-Statesman’s Kevin Lyttle, Circuit of the Americas chairman Bobby Epstein made a case Wednesday for why COTA would be a good site for a Major League Soccer team. Epstein was approached by Capella Capital Partners about a joint effort with Precourt Sports Ventures to build a stadium at COTA. “I made Capella the same offer I made (Anthony) Precourt,” Epstein...
Letters to the editor: Aug. 5, 2018

Letters to the editor: Aug. 5, 2018

Re: Aug. 1 article, “Retired Texas teachers face giant hurdle to pension boost.” As a retired teacher, I am concerned with the health of the Teacher Retirement System. It was interesting that system officials stated that “changes in marketplace and the global economic outlook” were to blame for the projected return decrease. Seems I’ve heard this before, yet the stock...
Letters to the editor: Aug. 6, 2018

Letters to the editor: Aug. 6, 2018

The coverage of the closing of The Frisco, the last of the Night Hawk chain, reminds me of a great compliment from the past. In the early ’70s, I enjoyed meeting artists and public figures as a member of the University of Texas Unions speakers committee. I got to host the well-known Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges. He had previously spent time at UT and had come to make a speech. When I...
Commentary: Remember Hiroshima. Think disarmament

Commentary: Remember Hiroshima. Think disarmament

As we remember the first atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan — Aug. 6, 1945 — during World War II, let’s rededicate our efforts toward nuclear disarmament. The nukes dropped on Hiroshima and later Nagasaki three days later brought an end to World War II. Those bombs, which devastated the two Japanese cities, pale in comparison to the power of nuclear weapons today. We must continue...
Commentary: Success, or failure, of new Army Command rests on Congress

Commentary: Success, or failure, of new Army Command rests on Congress

In July, the U.S. Army announced that Austin will be the location for its new Futures Command headquarters. The command, intended to be the spearhead of the Army’s modernization effort, will direct the research and development of new military technologies and build partnerships with civilian innovators in academia and industry. Futures Command has clear objectives, the authority of a four-star...
Editorial: Austin needs details to have a deal on MLS stadium

Editorial: Austin needs details to have a deal on MLS stadium

After months of public discussion and a round of negotiations, the proposed Major League Soccer stadium deal has improved considerably. But, without more details, it’s not clear this deal would fall in Austin’s win column. The City Council should iron out specific commitments with Precourt Sports Ventures on parking, transportation and penalties for breaking the contract before deciding...
Commentary: Women should decide what happens after an abortion

Commentary: Women should decide what happens after an abortion

Texas officials are again in court defending yet another medically unnecessary anti-abortion law. But this new law isn’t just the latest effort by politicians to interfere with the right of women to make their own health care decisions; it also tramples over the varying faith perspectives and beliefs around the issue. Senate Bill 8, which the Legislature passed last year, requires abortion facilities...
Commentary: Don’t blame nonprofits for family separations at the border

Commentary: Don’t blame nonprofits for family separations at the border

Government-mandated separation of families at our southern border finally sparked collective outrage about the treatment of families seeking asylum in the U.S. But now we have a new problem: Some people are villainizing nonprofit agencies that have been serving immigrant families for decades. This is a mistake. These nonprofits need support now more than ever. Unfortunately, negative media attention...
Commentary: Give Austin a broader voice; vote on democracy dollars

Commentary: Give Austin a broader voice; vote on democracy dollars

The Austin City Council has an opportunity to help the people fight big money when it meets on Aug. 9. On their desk is a proposed charter amendment to empower all Austin voters to be small-dollar contributors in city elections. Seattle recently approved a similar measure and it’s been a huge success. Currently, Austin’s City Council candidates rely on money from outside their districts...
Commentary: In Austin library, a welcome glimpse of total inclusion

Commentary: In Austin library, a welcome glimpse of total inclusion

The stunning Austin Central Library, already a finalist for the International Federation of Library Associations’ Public Library of the Year, leaped in prestige by winning LEED Platinum Building Certification this summer. The award confirms that the space’s design and construction exemplify the utmost concern for human and environmental health. The library scored high marks for its green...
Letters to the editor: Aug. 3, 2018

Letters to the editor: Aug. 3, 2018

Re: July 31 article, “Austin’s top single-family water user in 2017: a U.S. congressman.” To users of more than a million gallons of water a year: What is it about the term “limited resource” you do not understand? Being able to afford it doesn’t entitle you to use more than your fair share of this limited resource. My average annual water use for the last three...

Grumet: Goodnight CodeNext (with apologies to Goodnight Moon)

In the great map room There was a consultant And a neighborhood vexed And a picture of The transect zones from CodeNext And there were 11 council members In yellow vests and hard hats And a planning commission At odds with the ZAP And three drafts of a code That made people holler And piles of invoices For eight million dollars And a petition drive for an election fight And a frustrated mayor who...
Facebook comments: Aug. 3, 2018

Facebook comments: Aug. 3, 2018

As reported by the American-Statesman’s Julie Chang, a poll by the Texas Lyceum found that most Texans disapprove of how Congress and the federal government handle the country’s health care issues despite supporting the Medicaid and Medicare programs. “Of the 1,178 adult Texans polled, 71 percent said they had little or no trust in the federal government to do what’s best for...
Letters to the editor: Aug. 2, 2018

Letters to the editor: Aug. 2, 2018

Re: July 29 article, “Why more don’t try to shop for health care.” Health care shopping might work, but it is in no way like shopping for socks. Inquiring about the price — without insurance — of a possible procedure at a hospital for a relative, I was stonewalled. One hospital will not give an estimate until you have already signed up for the procedure. You must know...
Commentary: Pies and politics. Eating at the Frisco in Austin’s 1970s

Commentary: Pies and politics. Eating at the Frisco in Austin’s 1970s

On Sunday, the Frisco on Burnet Road closed. My family and I ate at this venerable Austin restaurant for the last time two days before it closed. Seems like every one of a certain age in Central Austin had the same idea. The wait was about an hour, with many customers having to stand by the cash register until host Darrell Webber guided them back to a table. I didn’t grow up in Austin, but throughout...
Editorial: Jig is up on Bastrop sheriff’s ‘zero tolerance’ traffic sweep

Editorial: Jig is up on Bastrop sheriff’s ‘zero tolerance’ traffic sweep

The documents leave little doubt that Bastrop County Sheriff Maurice Cook’s “zero tolerance” traffic sweep in June was a thin guise to round up drivers suspected of being in the country illegally. In a sense, the plan worked: Deputies concentrated in western Bastrop County, a brown pocket in a largely white county, and arrested 28 people on June 23 for driving-related offenses. All...

Opinion: Action must be taken to address black community’s problems

During the weekend of Aug. 4-5 (and the preceding Friday night), 12 Chicagoans were shot dead, and 62 others were shot and wounded, the Chicago Tribune reported. Before last week’s mayhem, 1,718 Chicagoans had been shot since the beginning of the year, and 306 had been murdered. Adding to this tragedy is the fact that Chicago’s clearance rate is less than 15 percent. That means that in...

Opinion: ‘BlacKkKlansman’ holds a mirror to America’s deepest problem

The credits were rolling, Spike Lee’s latest offering to cinema, the Cannes Film Festival sensation “BlacKkKlansman,” was concluding in a Midwestern premiere. A man seated next to him leaned over to Lee’s co-writer Kevin Willmott with a confession, followed by a denial. “I voted for Donald Trump,” he said. There was a pause, as others within earshot at the small...

Opinion: Oh, the Humanities!

In the spring of 1946, W.H. Auden came to Harvard to read a poem to the university’s Phi Beta Kappa chapter. Titled “Under Which Lyre: A Reactionary Tract for the Times,” the poem envisioned a postwar world in which, the war-god Ares having quit the field, public life would be dominated by a renewed contest between “the sons of Hermes” and “Apollo’s children&rdquo...

Opinion: Summertime is puppy time

“Have any big plans for the summer?” people sometimes ask by way of small talk. I reply literally: “Yes, housetraining a new puppy.” Our newest family member is a 12-week-old Labrador retriever mix — jet black from the top of his nose to the tip of his slightly odd long tail. When I phoned the local vet to make his first appointment, the receptionist asked his age (he...

Opinion: Stop calling Trump a populist

Message to those in the news media who keep calling Donald Trump a “populist:” I do not think that word means what you think it means. It’s true that Trump still, on occasion, poses as someone who champions the interests of ordinary working Americans against those of the elite. And I guess there’s a sense in which his embrace of white nationalism gives voice to ordinary Americans...
Author brings ‘Beowulf’ to the suburbs in spot-on retelling

Author brings ‘Beowulf’ to the suburbs in spot-on retelling

Maria Dahvana Headley, a writer of juvenile fiction and fantasy, steps into the adult world with “The Mere Wife,” a spot-on reimagining of a classic of Old English literature. Think “mere” as sea, as in the Old English, and not just as some dismissive term. Think of the world as the author of “Beowulf” did, where sea caves shelter monsters and great mead halls harbor...

Opinion: Portland progressives: So much to protest, so little time

“The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.” — L.P. Hartley WASHINGTON — They do things differently in Portland, but not because it is a foreign country, although many Americans might wish it were: At this moment, it is one national embarrassment too many. Rather, the tumults in Portland, which is a petri dish of progressivism, perhaps reveal something...

Opinion: ‘Nothing that boy did could ever justify what happened to him’

“Nothing that boy did could ever justify what happened to him.” So says Carolyn Bryant Donham in historian Timothy B. Tyson’s 2017 book, “The Blood of Emmett Till.” You keep hoping for more, hoping to hear her wrestle with her crime, explain how she could have done what she did — and how she lives with herself now. But in the end, the admission is all she gives...
Letters to the editor: Aug. 11, 2018

Letters to the editor: Aug. 11, 2018

Re: Aug. 8 article, “Travis County to purchase $8 million paper trail voting system.” It is not common for government workers to receive outside praise, but Travis County Clerk Dana DeBeauvoir certainly deserves a huge pat on the back for fighting for and finally getting approval for a state-of-the-art voting system. The new digital system will include a paper trail for each vote that...

Opinion: The Democrats’ rhetoric is just as dangerous as Trump’s

WASHINGTON — This week a New York man, Carlos Bayon, was arrested after leaving threatening messages for House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., and Conference Chairman Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., promising to go after their families and “feed them lead.” When police raided his home, they found 200 rounds of ammunition as well receipts for an assault rifle and handgun and...

Opinion: Building a Trump-free barbecue

Our issue for today is: topics to be banned at weekend barbecues. Or, maybe for the entire month of August. Do you want to take a vacation from politics? From any mention of the word “collusion?” From all discussions about the prospects for the Senate election in North Dakota? My old pal Arthur Brooks argues that people need at least two weeks of politics cleanse. (“Think of it as...
Facebook comments: Aug. 10, 2018

Facebook comments: Aug. 10, 2018

As reported by the American-Statesman’s Ryan Faircloth, Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller shared on article on Facebook linking Illinois’ first “Barack Obama Day” to shootings in Chicago last weekend that left 12 dead and dozens more wounded. He wrote a short preface above the link, “The downfall of a once great American city will be a major part of Barack Obama&rsquo...

Opinion: Are globalists plotting a counter-revolution?

On meeting with the EU’s Jean-Claude Juncker last month, Donald Trump tweeted: “Both the U.S. and the E.U. drop all Tariffs, Barriers and Subsidies! That would finally be Free Market and Fair Trade.” Did Larry Kudlow somehow get access to Trump’s phone? We know not. But, on hearing this, Steve Forbes, Stephen Moore and Arthur Laffer broke into the “Hallelujah” chorus...

Opinion: Listening to history’s echoes

WASHINGTON — How do democratic countries get to the point where they give up on self-rule? Under what circumstances do demagogues capture large audiences through irrational, emotional appeals unmoored from fact, logic or morality? When do politicians responsible for maintaining a democratic system surrender to dictators? These questions are more pertinent to us in the early 21st century than...

Opinion: Colleges — A force for evil

Many of the nation’s colleges have become a force for evil and a focal point for the destruction of traditional American values. The threat to our future lies in the fact that today’s college students are tomorrow’s teachers, professors, judges, attorneys, legislators and policymakers. A recent Brookings Institution poll suggests that nearly half of college students believe that...
Author John Green wants you to read tiny books

Author John Green wants you to read tiny books

John Green is one of the biggest young-adult authors in the world. Now he wants to get small. Four of his best-selling novels — including “The Fault in Our Stars” — will be released this October in a radically new miniature format. All the original words will be there, but the pages will be squeezed down to something about the size of a cellphone. But that’s just the...

Opinion: Waiting for Caesar

In the eight years of the Obama presidency, there were three cycles of policymaking. First came the attempt to pass an ambitious liberal agenda through a Democratic-controlled Congress, which ended with the Republican House takeover in 2010. Then came the attempt to strike bargains, grand and otherwise, with John Boehner and congressional Republicans, which petered out early in Barack Obama&rsquo...

Opinion: Plastic gun blueprints are out there; guns will follow

It’s not often that I find myself in agreement with Dana Loesch, spokesperson for the National Rifle Association. But on one crucial aspect of 3D-printed guns, she’s right: Pandora’s box has been opened. The blueprints are circulating. Loesch is probably much happier about that than I am. Her organization has fought tooth and nail to stop any regulation of firearms. The new 3D-printed...

Opinion: There’s more than one kind of corruption

When people think of corruption in high places, they tend to think of elites feathering their own nests. Bill and Hillary Clinton monetized political power into a personal fortune of hundreds of millions, and played the system better than any couple since Napoleon and Josephine. Paul Manafort is alleged to have sold his services to sketchy foreign powers (including a Putin puppet in Ukraine), pocketed...
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