Why all those names on Austin dedication plaques?

A 2010 list on the Pfluger Bridge Extension bothered a reader.


A reader asks our Austin Answered project: “Why do politicians and construction companies place their names on public property? These places are for people. They are not billboards.”

We asked him to clarify: “Do you mean the cornerstones and dedication plaques that go onto structures honoring the folks who authorized them, or paid for them, or built them?”

The reader sent a prompt and thoughtful response.

“See the plaque attached,” he writes, referring to an image of the 2010 dedication plaque for the Pfluger Pedestrian Bridge Extension. “This is the one that makes me question why all those names on this plaque. Architect, I understand. Even builder or one or two people who played a key role in the project.”

The reader put his finger on an old practice. Dedication plaques and cornerstones with similarly extensive credits go back to the ancient world. Memorial or historical markers survive in the thousands from the medieval period.

“It would have been much more meaningful to say that this bridge was built for the people to keep them safe from the traffic on Lamar Boulevard,” he continues. “Followed by a simple thanks to those involved for designing a wonderful bridge. I’ve been in Austin 20 years and heard there was a guy that was even killed in traffic on Lamar.”

Indeed, the narrow sidewalk on the Lamar Boulevard Bridge, completed in 1942, was — and remains — extraordinarily dangerous. A pedestrian was killed when a car jumped the curb in 200o. A drunken driver struck and killed a cyclist on the sidewalk in 1991.

The James D. Pfluger Pedestrian Bridge, named for a notable Austin architect who helped design the city’s trail system, was completed in 2001 — but was avoided by many until the extension spanned West Cesar Chavez Street and linked cyclists, walkers and joggers to the Lance Armstrong Bikeway and North Lamar, completed 2011.



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