Some Texas schools districts still struggling to reopen after Harvey


About a dozen school districts damaged by Harvey are not yet open.

Recovery costs for school districts will be lower than expected, officials say.

The Texas Education Agency can tap next year’s budget to help pay for Harvey recovery.

Most Texas school districts in counties hit by Harvey have opened, but officials at eight school districts in the Beaumont area as well as some in and around Corpus Christi haven’t started classes yet.

State Education Commissioner Mike Morath told the State Board of Education on Wednesday that more than 1.4 million public school students are in counties affected by the storm. The timing of the storm thrust into uncertainty the start date for many districts as well how school boards would approve their budgets, which must be done by Aug. 31 of each year.

“The hurricane was pretty massive,” Morath said. “We have been feverishly busy trying to support the affected school districts and charters all over the state of Texas.”

RELATED: As floodwaters recede, Beaumont area residents look toward recovery

The Houston school district has implemented a rolling start date for classes. The Woodsboro school district has reopened, but the Sheldon school district near Houston won’t reopen until Monday. Eight school districts in the Beaumont area either won’t start until next week or aren’t sure when they’ll reopen. The Ingleside, Port Aransas, Aransas County and Aransas Pass school districts in the Corpus Christi area aren’t open yet.

Morath said Aransas Pass school board members, some of them in shelters, had to adopt the district’s budget over the phone shortly after the storm hit.

He added that school districts in affected areas opened up their campuses for evacuees and fired up cafeterias to feed families. Although the Pasadena superintendent couldn’t get to the school, she was able to remotely unlock it to house about 1,000 people. The Houston school district opened some 40 schools to house evacuees, too.

Texas Education Agency staff members and teachers also stepped up to conduct rescues and send donations to devastated areas, Morath said.

“The stories of heartbreak and of heroism that we’ve heard are nothing short of unbelievable,” he said.

RELATED: 268 Houston schools open after Harvey delay

Morath said Gov. Greg Abbott has worked with FEMA officials to bring down recovery costs for school districts. In most cases, school districts will only have to pay 10 percent, instead of 25 percent, of recovery costs for, among other things, repairing buildings, replacing textbooks and buying computers and food.

He said the Texas Education Agency can tap its 2019 budget to help pay for any costs incurred by Harvey. Any hole left in the 2019 budget will have to be addressed in the next regular legislative session, which starts January 2019.

Morath also said the agency isn’t likely to suspend state standardized tests this year or counting student scores in the state’s accountability ratings of schools. As of Wednesday, 233,500 people have signed an online petition to cancel the test and use that money for Harvey recovery.

RELATED: Austin’s mega-shelter for Harvey evacuees to close soon

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