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Alex Jones tears up, says ex-wife’s lawyer has ‘no decency, zero’



Alex Jones parried with attorney Bobby Newman for most of the day at his child custody hearing.

Jones said that Newman had “no decency,” twisting facts about the children’s relationship with their parents.

But Newman elicited that Jones annually smoked marijuana to test the strength of pot.

Alex Jones, the provocative Austin broadcaster with a tough-guy persona, teared up on the stand Thursday afternoon and, in an emotional outburst, told his ex-wife’s attorney that the lawyer has “no decency, zero.”

“You sit here and twist things, I’ve never seen anything like it in all of literature or the movies,” Jones told Bobby Newman, an attorney for Kelly Jones, seated a few feet in front of him in a Travis County courtroom. “You have won the award sir. No decency, zero.”

The confrontation came as Newman, on the fourth day of the Jones custody trial, sought to undermine Alex Jones’ claims to being the superior parent under whose primary custody for the last 30 months the three children, ages 9, 12 and 14, have flourished.

Herman: Alex Jones, often offensive, plays defense at custody trial

Newman had just described how their son had been distraught for three days after not being able to visit with his mother.

But Alex Jones said that was because Kelly Jones had spurned the son’s visit, sending him home with his father.

Kelly Jones’ legal team is attempting to show that Jones has been responsible for the children’s alienation from their mother. Jones has insisted that he bent over backwards to make the children visit and get along with their mother, to no avail.

“I should not have pushed as hard as I did,” he said.

But when Newman asked Alex Jones to describe Kelly Jones’ good qualities as a mother, Jones, staring at his ex-wife, said, “I cannot perjure myself. She doesn’t have any good qualities.”

Later, he qualified that, saying she has some good qualities, but “any good is sandwiched with bad.”

“There’s a term, `no good,’” he said. “It doesn’t mean there’s no good in it. It means no good comes out of it.”

Jones, best known for his fringe politics and ranting style on the popular Infowars radio and web show, testified that he brings home “none of the bombasity, none of the rage” he displays on Infowars.

Under questioning from Newman, Jones said he considers himself to be “kind and gentle” 95 percent of the time on Infowars, but “that’s not what gets cherry-picked” by his critics.

At home, Jones put himself as kind and gentle 99.5 percent of the time, but Newman asked whether that was the same “kind and gentle” he brings to Infowars.

RELATED: On the stand, Alex Jones testifies he means what he says on Infowars

Newman’s cross-examination of Jones began on a cordial note.

“Good morning, Mr. Jones,” Newman said.

“Hey, how you doing?” Jones replied.

But it went downhill from there.

“You haven’t had any chili this morning?” Newman asked Jones.

“Is that a serious question?” Jones asked Newman.

It was. Newman was referring to Jones’ statement in a March 4 deposition in which he attributed his inability to remember the names of some of his children’s teachers to having just eaten a “big ol’ bowl of chili.”

Pressed by Newman, Jones acknowledged that he had smoked marijuana in Texas, in violation of state law, in the last year-and-a-half or two years. He said it was part of his practice to test marijuana once a year so that he can determine its strength, and that had led him to believe it is too strong and shouldn’t be legalized but simply decriminalized.

And then, in a flourish that echoed his Infowars broadcast, he said the marijuana legalization campaign was a dangerous path being funded by liberal philanthropist George Soros. Soros, a frequent target of his, is at the center of Jones’ mapping of a pernicious global elite.

Of his marijuana testing protocol, Jones said, “That’s what police do. They smoke it once a year too.”

READ: 12 Alex Jones conspiracy theories that could come up in court

Newman used the March deposition testimony to tie Jones up in knots about whether he had acknowledged having sex with a woman, who remains a friend, even after his new wife, Erika — who is now eight-plus months pregnant — moved into his home after their engagement in November 2015.

In the deposition, Jones acknowledged that he continued having sex with the other woman until about March 2016. But, when Newman pressed Jones to confirm his previous testimony, Jones offered a befuddled look and said, “I’d have to see a calendar.”

He later denied that he had sex with the other woman after his engagement.

Newman also said that Jones had indicated in the deposition that he takes all 36 nutraceuticals he sells on Infowars on a daily basis. Jones said he uses all the products, but not every day, and insisted, “Let’s check the record.”

It turned out that Jones was right, that he had previously testified that he “cycled through” the 36 products weekly, not every day.

Affirmed, Jones exclaimed in the direction of his attorneys, that’s why he wanted to check every assertion Newman makes, “so I can go boom, boom, boom, boom.”

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