Viewpoints: Releasing bomber’s recording would help heal a wounded city


We urge the Austin Police Department to release the recorded confession Mark A. Conditt left behind. The public’s right to hear the 28-minute audio recording of the bomber who terrorized the city for much of March far outweighs reasons for keeping it secret.

We do understand temporarily withholding some information to protect the integrity of an ongoing investigation, as Texas law permits. But the primary objection of law enforcement goes to another issue: That releasing it might inspire copycats or glorify a bomber who killed without regrets.

Under that reasoning, the recording would be hidden from the public. Forever. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE.



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