Viewpoints: Congress must keep health insurance for CHIP kids


About 400,000 Texas children and thousands of pregnant women are in danger of being tossed from their health coverage for no good reason — other than Congress is dragging its feet in reauthorizing the hugely successful Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

By late-December, state health officials will send families letters informing them they will lose CHIP coverage by about the end of January if Congress doesn’t reauthorize CHIP or contingencies aren’t rolled out. At that point, Texas kids will be left in the lurch.

Such inaction amounts to political malpractice, given the stakes: the health and welfare of 9 million kids across the nation whose parents are working but earning too little to afford private health insurance. Those families earn too much to qualify for Medicaid, the federal health insurance program for the poor, so CHIP fills that gap and has done so successfully for 20 years. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE.



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