Letters to the editor: Sept. 1. 2018


Re: Aug. 28 article, “We asked Longhorns what new UT Austin students should know before school starts. Here’s what they said.”

Maribel Molina had a lot of good advice. However, one idea that could have been suggested was the enormous support that student groups at area churches provide.

Our church, University Presbyterian Church, on San Antonio Street, is just one that feeds, encourages, supports and advises students. Our ministers are young and still involved in advanced classes themselves. UPC has been there for 125 years. We welcome all. There are many other churches near campus. Explore all your options for success. A church will remind you that there are other age groups that can and will enrich your college life.

MARY ANN PARKER, AUSTIN

We drove to downtown Austin to spend the day one recent weekend. We cut our day short because of the scooters.

As were walking on the sidewalk, the scooters just zoomed by and missed us within a foot. When driving, my husband had to be on guard the whole time because they just whip all over the place. While watching many of the scooters, you could plainly see not every user had full control.

I am just wondering what’s going to happen when a scooter runs into someone who’s walking and causes injury.

I’m not against other forms of transportation, but everyone has to be safe.

THERESA BURGER, LEANDER

Re: Aug. 28 commentary, “Mourn Iowa student, but don’t blame all immigrants.”

I feel that Mary Sanchez misunderstands how most Americans feel about border security. The issue is not about blaming immigrants; it’s about the need for our federal government to fulfill their responsibility to keep the American people out of harm’s way. Not all of the “illegal” immigrants crossing our border are seeking asylum. We have criminals, drug smugglers, terrorists and murderous gang members like those that belong to MS-13, who threaten the lives of “legal” citizens. The drug problem alone results in many deaths each year and ruining the lives of innocent American citizens.

So, the deaths of Mollie Tibbetts and Kate Steinle are a small but serious part of the border security problem. Blaming “illegal” immigrants for their deaths is not what people are concerned about. We need to expect protection and safety to be provided by our government. We want a system that assures our safety.

MIKE MCGINNITY, GEORGETOWN

Sunday, President Trump turned down a statement from his staff praising John McCain and issued a brief tweet expressing condolences for the family. He had time to prepare a reaction, and he did.

But to praise McCain for his heroism, for his physical and mental sacrifice for this nation would be admitting that he was wrong when he said that McCain was no hero. (They don’t give the Distinguished Flying Cross to cowards.)

Trump will never admit to error. He had no right to deny the military bravery of this hero while he stayed home. That said, I voted for Trump, and I will likely do it again because the Democratic Party has become the party of socialism and treason.

KEN BREWER, LEANDER

Any Trump supporter who still believes President Trump’s claims of a “witch hunt” after Donald’s personal lawyer Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to various felonies implicating Mr. Trump in a cover-up, and after Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort was found guilty of numerous felonies, is delusional.

This is not a soap opera for the lazy-minded. Exposing felons in the Trump administration deserves every American’s fullest attention. “Crooked Donald” has been complicit in crimes against the country.

RON LOWE, HARLINGEN

Many reactionary evangelicals have preached that “God showed up” in the 2016 election. If so, He also showed up in federal courtrooms for the corruption cases involving former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort and Trump attorney Michael Cohen. Now, maybe the Almighty can part the Red Sea of complicity long enough for Congress to again believe that righteousness exalts our nation, but evil is a reproach.

JACK BOWEN, FORT WORTH

Correction

A commentary Thursday about U.S. Rep. Roger Williams should have stated that ending protections for Texans with pre-existing medical conditions would result from repealing the Affordable Care Act.



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