Letters to the editor: July 11, 2018


Unfortunately, many Americans abhor our president, who is perceived as not caring about anything other than himself. Now is his final chance to “Make America Great Again.” He can do this simply by nominating a moderate Republican judge or a truly high-quality, middle-of-the-road and highly respected justice to fill the open slot on the Supreme Court. This would show that he truly wants to unite the country, especially with a large majority agreement by the Senate.

With this single act, he could overnight go from one of the most truly hated presidents in the history of the country to the one of the great unifiers of all time. The entire country would heave a sigh of relief, and we would gain a functioning Congress. That would be true leadership.

President Trump specializes in surprise, ego-fulfillment and changing his mind. I don’t think he will do it, but I love nice surprises.

CARLTON ERICKSON, AUSTIN

Mayor Steve Adler is the perfect leader for liberal and weird Austin.

He is doing a fine job marching Austin into closer alignment with the liberal mothership, California. The similarities are numerous and frightful.

Both have a rapidly growing homeless population with no clear solution in sight. Home affordability has hit a crisis level for both, again with no solution in sight. Both employ numerous regulations, hurdles and fees for development — another cause for the high cost of housing. Both do little to facilitate low-income housing. Traffic is a nightmare and only getting worse. Both areas have heavily taxpayer funded public transit that is poorly managed and underutilized.

Adler might be a fine man, but his politics get in the way of good judgment.

CHRIS RINK, AUSTIN

Re: July 1 letter to the editor, “I don’t like Trump, but I like his policies.”

Just examine the Trump policy on the environment. A long list of proposed policies would reverse the progress made thus far and would erode our environment. Some major policies are: funding reduction for climate monitoring to curb carbon emissions; cutting research for clean energy programs; starting rollback of car emissions standards; and halting mining health study. Environmental protections help improve the air we breathe and the water we drink.

American Public Health Association reports many health impacts of warming temperatures and rising pollution on people, especially those with heart problems, lung disease or allergies. It is taking a toll on construction and agricultural workers.

Please ask your lawmakers to join a bipartisan Climate Solutions Caucus in the U.S. house, which has 42 Republicans and 42 Democrats who are working to find solutions and pursue policies to improve health and quality of life.

Why would you like Trump policy on the environment?

KALPANA SUTARIA, AUSTIN

I commend the Statesman for its excellent and continuing coverage of the crisis on our border. Many media have pivoted from this heart-wrenching story to the Supreme Court, which is what the administration prefers to have: a spotlight to continue shining on its cruel policies.

They talk of poor people of color as an “infestation,” the same tactics used by the Nazis. All the migrants are doing is seeking the same freedom and opportunity that all of our forebears came for — and are willing to work for.

I urge immigration lawyers to help unite the young children with their parents. I urge people of conscience to donate to organizations that provide legal assistance to the desperate families, such as RAICES and the Texas Civil Rights Project. I urge community and faith leaders to keep fighting to keep our country a beacon to the world, not a shameful example of bigotry and fear.

ANNE BARNSTONE, AUSTIN

In the rhetoric about immigration, one hears no discussion about holding employers accountable for hiring those who are in the country legally.

We hear about border security, treating families in detention with compassion and the proposed wall. But no one on either side of the political aisle talks about addressing the root problem: the economic opportunity that attracts people to our country.

We need an effective system for registering immigrants and laws that penalize employers who hire those who are not here legally. Until employers face significant penalties — maybe even criminal liability — for hiring those here illegally and are given an effective means of determining the status of job applicants, immigrants will continue to be drawn to the prosperity we enjoy in the United States.

With such a system, we may understand how much our economy requires the labor of those we now condemn.

ROBERT BLUETHMAN, AUSTIN

Correction

A commentary published July 5 advocating East Austin have its own school district incorrectly said the DeSoto Independent School District was created under a state provision allowing separating an area from an independent school district into a new one.



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