Letters to the editor: Aug. 21, 2018


I purchased a new 2018 Tesla all-electric vehicle this year. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality’s Texas Emissions Reduction Plan program offers $2,500 rebates on new electric vehicles. The rebate’s mission is to encourage residents to buy clean energy vehicles (tceq.texas.gov/airquality/terp).

Teslas are not eligible for this rebate because of their business model. Because customized orders are placed directly with the manufacturer online and Tesla stores are not allowed to take orders, it’s considered an out-of-state sale, meaning they are ineligible. Unfair!

LIDA JENNEY, MANCHACA

I have the perfect name for the new soccer stadium: Screw U Crew. Because that is exactly what has happened to the average tax-paying citizen.

Our liberal City Council under the direction, guidance, and influence of our “esteemed” mayor, Steve Adler, have pulled off another slam to those of us who bear the burden of financing (tax-free) entities such as the recent approval of the use of McKalla Place property. When is enough, enough?

JOAN JOHNSON, AUSTIN

Thank you, Bill McRaven, for giving up what you and everyone else that leaves a government position should do. As a private citizen, you and others like you have no business meddling (security clearance) in the nation’s business.

You did your time, thank you very much, but now someone else is in charge. As the saying goes, lead, follow or get out of the way. If you don’t like the way things are going, run for office. Otherwise, show up at the polls and cast your vote like the rest of us.

JOHN LEFNER, AUSTIN

Kudos to Bill McRaven. He said what I wished I could say. He is a hero in my eyes, and I believe he says what I am thinking. I don’t have as much at stake as he does, but I am so proud of him for his courage to tell it like it is.

ROBERT BYRAM, AUSTIN

Re: Aug. 13 commentary, “Two views: ‘Red flag’ law makes us vulnerable to ‘thought police.’

Rachel Malone’s contribution to the gun debate is just another serving of the usual National Rifle Association/GOP-style baloney.

Simply put, she speaks for people who would rather have free and unfettered access to guns than have living children. They have made their choice, and we all must live with it.

Make America Great Again?

MARK MCCARTHY, ROUND ROCK

Regarding the debate over Confederate and pioneer statues, unfortunately, this is our history. Every country has moments in history that they regret. We should not apply 2018 thinking into the hearts and minds of people who suffered through our country’s growing pains; they did what they thought was right at the time.

We should not try to rewrite or ignore our history by removing it — but celebrate that we have learned from past misjudgments and no longer feel or act this way. Taking down statues all over the country won’t change the history, but it would eliminate a source of discussion for the next generation to see how far we have come.

ANNETTE BROWN, LAKEWAY

Re: Aug. 16 commentary, “Journalists are watchdog neighbors, not enemy of the people.

Regarding Statesman editorial “Journalists are watchdogs — and your neighbors, too,” that headline is so true. The code of ethics of the Society of Professional Journalists is, “Seek truth and report it.”

When journalists don’t seek the truth but instead report the opinions of others, these so-called journalists become political propagandists. Americans love the truth. As a West Point graduate, I want the truth. Sadly, the media does not provide the truth.

SEL GRAHAM, AUSTIN

Re: Aug. 16 commentary, “Journalists are watchdog neighbors, not enemy of the people.

It is a shame that some of your readers dismiss local stories and have lost their confidence in your news reporting. It’s not that readers are uncomfortable with your stories, but it is your lies that make readers turn away.

Blaming the president on the current state of the press is not going to fix it.

CARMEN TONNE PFLUGERVILLE, TEXAS



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