Facebook comments: Sept. 2, 2018


In recent commentary, the American-Statesman editorial board wrote about Austin City Council District 1 candidate Lewis Conway Jr., whom the city clerk determined is eligible to appear on the November ballot though he is a convicted felon. The board supported the clerk’s decision, saying it “gives Austin voters the power to pick the candidate they believe is best suited for office.” Conway was convicted in 1992 of manslaughter.

Rene Coronado: Sorry, but felons should not run for office.

Ivan Doyle: If you don’t like it, just don’t vote for him. No reason he shouldn’t be able to campaign, free speech and all, government of, by, and for the people and all that.

Olga Berkovich Lopategui: And what’s wrong with letting the voters decide? As long as the criminal record is disclosed, it should not be an issue.

Wade Bozeman: He did the time he was given. If we are really about rehabilitation, then all should be forgiven — and this man should be able to move on in life. If we’re going to continue to punish him, why didn’t we just give him life in prison? Good luck to this man.

Bryan Register: Criminal records of people running for office should be part of the general application process. Past that, let people decide whether someone’s past actions show that they have such bad character that they shouldn’t be trusted with office. In the case of Mr. Lewis Conway Jr., I agree with him about some issues but not others. But I don’t believe that you can get an understanding of his character from a terrible and immoral decision that he made decades ago. Near as I can tell, he has used his punishment as a means of self-improvement — he actually did what we say the criminal justice system is supposed to get people to do.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Opinion

Herman: The building says something else, but you know him as Ronnie
Herman: The building says something else, but you know him as Ronnie

You know that deal when you don’t immediately recognize somebody’s real name? George Herman Ruth? Oh yeah, The Babe. Thomas Jonathan Jackson? Stonewall. Richard Starkey? Ringo. I kind of sort of had one of those moments this week while walking on West 11th Street across from the Travis County Courthouse. Bold letters on the bright and brand...
Commentary: When the Endangered Species Act arrived, species revived
Commentary: When the Endangered Species Act arrived, species revived

When humans arrived, species died. Homo sapiens in our geologically recent dispersal out of Africa have left paths of destruction across the planet, the one place in the universe we actually know life exists. Now, the Trump administration wants to roll back the Endangered Species Act (ESA), one of the cornerstones for the protection of this living...
Letters to the editor: Sept. 21, 2018

One intriguing aspect of “all politicians lie” is no politician ever disputes the claim. Politicians welcome the phrase as normal behavior in society. Once accepted, politicians are free from the burden of telling the truth. A trial defendant caught in a lie will be convicted. An applicant who lies during a job interview will not be hired...
Editorial: Take time to vet Kavanaugh allegation, run proper hearing
Editorial: Take time to vet Kavanaugh allegation, run proper hearing

The stakes couldn’t be higher. The next justice to be sworn onto the U.S. Supreme Court will likely serve for decades, providing a pivotal fifth vote on a nine-member court that has been narrowly divided on critical issues. The Affordable Care Act. Marriage equality. Protections for immigrants and visitors from Muslim-majority countries. Regulations...
Facebook comments: Sept. 21, 2018
Facebook comments: Sept. 21, 2018

As reported by the American-Statesman’s Mary Huber, 13 neighborhoods are starting to gentrify or see longtime residents displaced by rising property values, according to a new University of Texas study. Touted by researchers as one of the first steps toward solving the city’s affordability problem, the study looked at areas with large proportions...
More Stories