Facebook comments: May 18, 2018


As reported by the American-Statesman’s Katie Hall, Travis County Clerk Dana DeBeauvoir posed an urgent question to voters on Facebook: “Where are you???” In the same post she said that “an underwhelming 1.31 (percent) of registered voters cast ballots” on the first day of early voting. Early voting ends Friday. No voting will occur on the weekend and Election Day is May 22. Polling locations, sample ballots and ID requirements can be found at votetravis.com.

Jon Talley: Too busy working, so I can afford my property taxes to vote for people that are going to raise property taxes regardless of how I vote.

Pat Morgan: Excuses don’t get any changes when we do not vote.

Quay Morris: I do believe that voting matters, but … we need to make voting more accessible. It’s too restrictive right now for those who have to work. Which is just about everyone.

Cindy Weaver Schaufenbuel: It’s a matter of priorities and making a plan to get to the polls.

Kate Duncan: Working and having to pick up kids and parent. Maybe I can get out to vote after 9 p.m.? Oh wait, the polls are closed.

Catherine Ingram: Maybe Texas needs to consolidate and have fewer elections, so people don’t get election fatigued.

Bonnie Evans: Why try to find ride to vote early when I can wait until Election Day and walk a block from my house and vote?

Brianne Spear: Ummm, it’s only Day One of early voting. Also, there hasn’t been much promoting of this election. Texas really should adopt the mail-in ballots as an option when you register to vote.

Allison Alden: We just moved here from Arizona, where we have mail-in ballots. I can confirm: They really are a great option.



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