Facebook comments: June 15, 2018


As reported by the American-Statesman’s Chuck Lindell, a special committee of the Texas Senate held its second hearing in two days on school safety on Tuesday. The prospect of arming teachers and administrators to counter school shooters drew a sharp response at the meeting. Much of the attention focused on the school marshal program. The school guardian program, which allows districts to designate adults who are allowed to carry a concealed weapon on campus, was also discussed. Nothing was decided Tuesday. Two more hearings are planned haven’t been scheduled, but recommendations for action are likely to come in August.

Jennifer Maki Howser: I don’t want my son’s teacher to be armed. I want the right to choose a safe classroom for my child.

Regina Ackley: If they want to be armed, let them. If they don’t, that’s alright, too. No one is forcing anyone to protect anyone, just like a CHL holder isn’t obligated to defend another person.

Fernando Arista: Clear backpacks, metal detectors and uniforms would be better.

Carol Weber: I just don’t get it. Why do we have to even consider a teacher should also be responsible to stop a shooter? They have so much already on their plates now days. I can see where it will not be too long before we have a shortage of teachers because of security in schools.

Beau Fannon: Why are certain people so dead set against trusting law-abiding, trained citizens to shoulder the responsibility of protecting those around us?

Bonnie Villarreal: I am a veteran and a teacher — but I will not be armed in my classroom. That weapon is all I would be thinking about and not the lessons.

Gil Baca: Arm teachers with amazing salaries and supplies for all students. Plus, feed kids regardless of their socioeconomic background.



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