Here’s your list of SXSW downtown street closures


The South by Southwest festivals are here and it’s time to start thinking about your commute.

The festivals, beginning Friday and running through March 18, will tie up traffic on some of the city’s main downtown corridors.

Road closures started as early as 3 a.m. Friday, with some lasting for the entire festival. Maps showing all the planned closures are available on the city’s website.

Full closures are expected for the duration of SXSW on:

  • Sixth Street from Congress Avenue to Interstate 35.
  • Brazos Street from Fifth to Seventh streets.
  • Red River Street from Fifth to 10th streets.
  • Sabine Street from Fifth to Seventh streets.
  • •Trinity Street from Fifth to Sixth streets and from Fourth to Cesar Chavez streets.
  • •San Jacinto Boulevard from Fifth to Sixth streets.
  • •Rainey Street from Driskill to Cummings streets.

Other partial closures are planned on roads throughout the downtown area.

The city encourages people to use mass transit during the festival, particularly on Friday, which it calls the busiest transit day of the year.

On that day, throngs of visitors will make their way to Austin for the festival just as spring breakers hit the road out of town. Officials are encouraging people to walk, bike, carpool, take the bus or work from home.

Capital Metro is offering extended hours and increased service during the festival.

MetroRapid service will be extended to 2:30 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and until 10:30 p.m. on Sundays. MetroRail service will be extended daily too, running Saturdays from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. and on Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to midnight. Capital Metro will double the number of Night Owl buses operating most nights. For more information about hours and schedules visit Cap Metro’s website.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Local

Man gets 8-year sentence in Round Rock wreck that killed woman in 2016
Man gets 8-year sentence in Round Rock wreck that killed woman in 2016

A Hutto man has received an eight-year sentence in prison in the death of a woman in a crash outside of Round Rock in 2016. Hernan Martinez, 24, pleaded guilty Wednesday to manslaughter and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon for the wreck that killed 68-year-old Joan Chaney on Dec. 14, 2016, his lawyer said. He received the plea deal in exchange...
Texas has history of family separations, deportations
Texas has history of family separations, deportations

This is not the first time in Texas history that Latino migrants and refugees have been systematically intimidated, detained or deported, nor the first time that the fate of their separated children became the central drama. In April, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a “zero-tolerance” policy that has prompted the criminal...
Austin man gets 99 years in drug-related murder
Austin man gets 99 years in drug-related murder

When a 19-year-old Austin man reached out and apologized to a drug dealer he robbed, he figured everything was smoothed over and they could go on amicably, prosecutors say. A year later, Kenneth Johnson climbed into a car with the dealer’s brother and quickly found out that he wasn’t forgiven after all. Within minutes, Johnson had been...
3 asylum-seekers separated from their children sue federal government
3 asylum-seekers separated from their children sue federal government

Three Central American asylum-seekers are suing the federal government after they were separated from their children. The three plaintiffs are suing the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Department of Health and Human Services and other agencies. They also name 10 government officials. According to Politico...
Southwest Key considered giving up contracts over family separations
Southwest Key considered giving up contracts over family separations

Leaders at an Austin-based nonprofit that operates 16 shelters for immigrant children in Texas considered ending its relationship with the federal government amid furor over President Donald Trump’s zero tolerance immigration policy, the organization’s CEO told the American-Statesman on Thursday. “We said, what if we … didn&rsquo...
More Stories