Salesman accused of stealing more than $17,000 from building company


Chad May is accused of stealing payments for portable buildings, an affidavit said.

May promised the company he would repay what he took but he did not, document said.

A former salesman has been accused of stealing more than $17,000 from a portable building company in Liberty Hill, according to an arrest affidavit.

Chad May, 43, was charged with theft, a state jail felony punishable by up to two years in jail. An employee of Derksen Portable Buildings doing an audit of past due accounts in January discovered more than $17,000 in missing money, the affidavit said. It said all the customers whose payments were behind said they had made them to May. Derksen Portable Buildings is at 14852-A Texas 29 West in Liberty Hill, the affidavit said.

The employee found records showing May was accepting the payments from March 2017 to January by money order and electronically to an account he owned named “Shed Time Texas,” the affidavit said.

When a business employee confronted May, the affidavit said, he admitted to taking the money and was fired. May agreed to repay the company and wrote several checks to it from a checking account in his wife’s name but all the checks were returned because the checking account had been closed, according to the affidavit.

It said an employee of the portable building company tried to reach May about the bounced checks but May stopped communicating March 1.

Police met with May later this month and he said he had taken the money because he was trying to start a contracting business and was using the money from his sales job to cover his losses, the affidavit said.

READ: Clerk at Lutheran School accused of stealing more than $12,000

May completed a statement while meeting with the police saying he would repay the money with money orders but he never repaid it, according to the affidavit.

He was released from the Williamson County Jail on Saturday after posting bail set at $50,000.

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