Health

What are kids given opioids for most often? It might surprise you

What are kids given opioids for most often? It might surprise you

What do we really know about opioids and children? Well, we know that the number of kids treated for opioid use in the emergency room has doubled from 2004-2015. Many of those were kids age 1 to 4 who had found someone else’s prescription. And, we know that American Academy of Pediatrics is looking at opioid use and the number of kids who come out of hospitals with...
Ever had cancer? Preexisting conditions can define your future

Ever had cancer? Preexisting conditions can define your future

Robin Shine Maddox has racked up $160,000 in charges for biopsies, chemotherapy, medications and scans since being diagnosed with breast cancer in February. Now the 55-year-old Mt. Airy resident looks forward to finishing treatment and being able to call herself a cancer survivor. But even then, she’ll be among the one-fourth of Americans under age 65 who could be uninsurable on the individual...
Ditching the doctor? What to know about home health tests

Ditching the doctor? What to know about home health tests

Medical tests save lives. Discovering diseases before they become more serious can mean the difference between life and death. But many Americans say they don’t have time to see a doctor, live too far from a medical facility or are so uncomfortable with examinations that they avoid tests altogether. These challenges have created a demand for home-based medical tests. The market is exploding...
These small steps can produce big results to your health

These small steps can produce big results to your health

To be sure, great healthcare is a big part of keeping citizens fit. Yet each of us individually has a big part to play as well. As health care moves from go-see-the-doctor-when-you’re-sick mode to I-want-to-feel-as-good-as-I can-every-day model, we have some work to do. No matter where we live, say experts, a few simple steps can reap big rewards to our health…if we practice them most...
The numbers that matter most in staying healthy

The numbers that matter most in staying healthy

Health often seems like a numbers game. What’s your blood-sugar level? How many calories are you eating? And are you getting the right percentage of macros (or macronutrients)? The problem is that sometimes we track, count and obsess over numbers that don’t matter very much for our overall health. Or worse, we ignore numbers that do matter. I was curious about which numbers my fellow dietitians...
FDA OKs 1st drug to treat smallpox, in case of terror attack

FDA OKs 1st drug to treat smallpox, in case of terror attack

U.S. regulators Friday approved the first treatment for smallpox — a deadly disease that was wiped out four decades ago — in case the virus is used in a terror attack. Smallpox, which is highly contagious, was eradicated worldwide by 1980 after a huge vaccination campaign. But people born since then haven't been vaccinated, and small samples of the smallpox virus were saved for research...
Can grackles make you sick? Find out what is lurking inside the birds

Can grackles make you sick? Find out what is lurking inside the birds

Sarah Hamer knows about the icky things that grackles, like all wild birds, can spread. She’s an associate professor of epidemiology and the director at the Schubot Avian Health Center at Texas A&M University. When it comes to grackles, where do you go to study them? Why, you show up with a team of students at your local H-E-B in College Station and start netting the birds. Hamer and her students...
INSIGHT: Vaccine skeptics say they know what’s best. Even for dogs

INSIGHT: Vaccine skeptics say they know what’s best. Even for dogs

One of the most contentious areas of health policy over the past two decades has been the safety of vaccination. Vaccines prevent the outbreak of diseases that used to be widespread, like polio, and scientific consensus strongly supports their safety. Yet many Americans refuse or delay the vaccination of their children out of fear that it could lead to autism, even though scientific consensus refutes...
Oprah ‘impressed’ with True Food Kitchen; invests in healthy restaurant chain

Oprah ‘impressed’ with True Food Kitchen; invests in healthy restaurant chain

Oprah Winfrey is expanding her portfolio, investing in a health-focused restaurant chain.  >> Read more trending news  The media mogul has partnered with True Food Kitchen as a shareholder. She is joining the company’s board of directors, which already includes health guru and celebrity doctor Andrew Weil. The Phoenix-based business, which has 23 locations across 10 states...
Doctor burnout can cause major medical errors, study finds

Doctor burnout can cause major medical errors, study finds

Your doctor’s own well-being can have an effect on the care you receive. In fact, physicians who are burned out can cause major medical errors, according to a new report.  >> Read more trending news  Researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine recently conducted a study, published in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, to evaluate doctor burnout and work safety in relation...
Texas couple, buckling under financial stress, says divorce only way to pay daughter’s health care 

Texas couple, buckling under financial stress, says divorce only way to pay daughter’s health care 

A Texas couple is considering a divorce to help finance their disabled daughter’s expensive medical treatment. >> Read more trending news  After nine years of marriage, Maria and Jake Grey are considering splitting their family up in order to qualify for Medicaid to help pay for their 6-year-old daughter’s health care costs, according to WFAA-TV. The couple’s daughter...
500 sick after potential E. coli outbreak at Gatlinburg, Tennessee zip line site

500 sick after potential E. coli outbreak at Gatlinburg, Tennessee zip line site

Hundreds of people reported developing a gastrointestinal illness after visiting a popular zip line site in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, according to a new report.  >> Read more trending news  Researchers from the Tennessee Department of Health recently conducted a survey to find out whether visitors became sick after visiting CLIMB Works, WVLT News reported. Investigators...
Angry job seeker arrested after outburst, erratic behavior while following up on application

Angry job seeker arrested after outburst, erratic behavior while following up on application

A Dayton man following up on a job application was arrested Monday afternoon after an angry outburst at a local business. >> Read more trending news  Charles J. Hagedorn, 44, was charged with assault and aggravated menacing after scuffling with employees at the Victoria Theatre in downtown Dayton, according to a city police report. Officers were dispatched to the theatre around 5:35...
Toddler loses toe in splash pad accident trying to cool off in scorching heat 

Toddler loses toe in splash pad accident trying to cool off in scorching heat 

The playground and splash pad at Buzzards Bay Park in Bourne, Massachusetts, are closed after a toddler lost a toe Tuesday afternoon.  >> Read more trending news Sgt. John R. Stowe Jr., a detective with the Bourne Police Department, confirmed that the child suffered “the loss of a lower extremity.” The extremity is believed to be a toe.  Police officers...
Travis commissioners sign off on $450 million Brackenridge lease

Travis commissioners sign off on $450 million Brackenridge lease

Travis County commissioners gave the greenlight Tuesday for the county health district to approve a 99-year lease of a portion of the former Brackenridge hospital campus for use by the University of Texas’ Dell Medical School. Central Health owns the prime six-block, 14.3-acre site at East 15th and Red River streets in downtown Austin, where the now-shuttered University Medical Center Brackenridge...
Man contracts flesh-eating bacteria while crabbing, could lose arms, legs

Man contracts flesh-eating bacteria while crabbing, could lose arms, legs

A New Jersey man may lose his legs and arms after he contracted a flesh-eating bacteria near a river in the state.  Angel Perez was crabbing at Matt’s Landing near Camden on July 2. Hours after the excursion, his right leg swelled. Then his daughter said that his leg started becoming brown and black and blistered, WPVI reported.  They took him to the hospital where doctors said...
Texas Digest: Landowners getting letters about border wall

Texas Digest: Landowners getting letters about border wall

SOUTH TEXAS More landowners get letters about wall More property owners along the U.S.-Mexico border in South Texas say they’ve received notices from the federal government asking to review their land, which could be used for border wall construction. KENS-TV reported that residents in the town of Escobares, including Mayor Noel Escobar, received letters from the Army Corps of Engineers and...
Trauma of separation lingers long after children reunite with parents

Trauma of separation lingers long after children reunite with parents

Long after the wailing and tears, the trauma of separation can linger in children’s minds, even after they are reunited with their parents, experts say. Under pressure from around the globe and his own party, President Donald Trump signed an executive order to keep migrant families together. For some, the crisis may now seem resolved. But experts warn that for many of those children, the psychic...
Marijuana addiction is real, and rising

Marijuana addiction is real, and rising

SAN RAFAEL, Calif. - For as long as most residents can remember, smoking marijuana has been a part of life here. The fact that California legalized the practice in January went practically unnoticed in this quiet town a half-hour’s drive north of San Francisco, where some say the normalization of America’s marijuana culture got its start. For Quintin Pohl and other teenagers before him...
Mental health calls, some fatal, a growing challenge for Austin police

Mental health calls, some fatal, a growing challenge for Austin police

At first, Austin police officer Randy Hunt thought the woman he saw in the parking lots under Interstate 35 near Seventh Street downtown was trying to break into cars. But as he approached her that morning of June 12, he realized she was wearing essentially a see-though dress torn enough to expose part of her breast and much of the rest of her body. “It turns out she was fixated on her reflection...
More kids are taking vitamins than a decade ago, but do they do any good?

More kids are taking vitamins than a decade ago, but do they do any good?

Every morning you make your kids breakfast and that breakfast includes a multivitamin in chewable or gummy form. You think, “Hey, even if they aren’t eating as many of the fruits and vegetables the food pyramid might recommend, at least this is something healthy we’re doing.” Right? Well, it turns out that you wouldn’t be alone. According to a...
Coffee drinker? You’re more likely to live longer, study finds

Coffee drinker? You’re more likely to live longer, study finds

The list of health benefits of drinking coffee continues to grow longer. A new study published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine revealed that coffee drinkers have a lower risk of death compared to non-coffee drinkers. To understand whether heavy coffee consumption is linked to an increased risk of mortality, researchers from Maryland and Illinois assessed demographic, lifestyle...
Austin family part of study for new FDA-approved drug from marijuana

Austin family part of study for new FDA-approved drug from marijuana

Last week, many families in the United States — including the Carriker family in Austin — got news they’ve been waiting for: The Food & Drug Administration approved the first prescription drug that uses cannabidiol, an oil derived from marijuana. The drug, an oral solution called Epidiolex from GW Pharmaceuticals, now is approved to treat seizures in two kinds of epilepsy &mdash...
Cyclospora cases on the rise in Texas, mostly in Travis County

Cyclospora cases on the rise in Texas, mostly in Travis County

Texas for the sixth summer in a row is experiencing a cyclospora outbreak, a spate of gastrointestinal illnesses caused by a tiny parasite that often clings to imported fresh produce. The Texas Department of Health and Human Services said it is investigating 58 cases of the illness that have occurred in Texas this year, the majority reported since May. Sixteen of those cases were in Travis County...
Mosquitoes in Ohio test positive for West Nile virus

Mosquitoes in Ohio test positive for West Nile virus

Mosquitoes trapped in Ohio are the first in the nation to test positive for the West Nile virus this summer, reports say. Test results released last week from the Ohio Department of Health showed mosquitoes found in Harrison Township in Licking County, which is east of Columbus, had the virus. West Nile virus is typically spread by mosquitoes. Symptoms can include fever, headache, stiffness,...
7 ways to help your child stop wetting the bed 

7 ways to help your child stop wetting the bed 

Bed-wetting is no fun for your child, who's waking up with soaked sheets, or for you, the parent. This problem is common, with about 5 million children in the U.S. wetting the bed, according to HealthyChildren.org. About 20 percent of 5-year-olds, 10 percent of 7-year-olds and 5 percent of 10-year-olds wet the bed. >> Read more trending news  If your child is wetting the bed, he or...
'Exposure to feces' blamed after dozens sickened at neighborhood cookout

'Exposure to feces' blamed after dozens sickened at neighborhood cookout

North Carolina authorities believe a contagious bacterial infection is to blame after more than a dozen people from the same east Charlotte apartment complex were rushed to the hospital after becoming sick Sunday afternoon following a birthday party and cookout. >> Read more trending news  Emergency responders were first called to the Forest Hills Townhomes on Four Seasons Boulevard...
Could being married save your life? Doctor gives thoughts on new heart study

Could being married save your life? Doctor gives thoughts on new heart study

Last week, we revealed that people who were not married (either never married, widowed or divorce) had a 42 percent increase risk of developing cardiovascular disease and a 16 percent increased risk of coronary heart disease and a 43 percent greater risk of dying from coronary heart disease and a 55 percent great risk of dying form a stroke. The study,...
Watch: Mom cries as deaf baby hears for the first time with implant

Watch: Mom cries as deaf baby hears for the first time with implant

One mother was unsure if her deaf infant would ever be able to listen to her voice. But when doctors installed an implant that allowed her baby to hear for the first time, she was moved to tears.  A team at Cooks Children’s Ear Nose and Throat hospital in Texas worked with Will and Anna Esler to create an implant for their daughter Ayla.  >> Read more trending news  In June...
Sticking with the same doctor could help you live longer, study finds

Sticking with the same doctor could help you live longer, study finds

Do you see the same general practitioner every time you visit the doctor? Doing so could lower your death rate, according to a new report. >> Read more trending news  Researchers from St. Leonard’s Practice and University of Exeter Medical School in Europe recently conducted a study, published in the BMJ Open, to determine the benefits of keeping the same doctor over time. ...
Virtual reality lets patients ease stress and pain

Virtual reality lets patients ease stress and pain

Despite being in and out of hospitals since the age of 16, one of Harmon Clarke’s biggest fears is having an intravenous line inserted into his arm. The 34-year-old resident of Los Angeles has had more than 30 surgeries related to his Crohn’s disease, but getting stuck with an IV needle has never gotten less stressful. “Because of my Crohn’s I get really dehydrated, which makes...
Today’s teens are less likely to smoke, drink, have sex — or eat veggies

Today’s teens are less likely to smoke, drink, have sex — or eat veggies

In June the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the results of its 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance study, a biennial survey that seeks to quantify the scope and magnitude of teen misbehavior. The survey finds that risky behavior - drinking, using drugs, having sex - is down nearly across the board among America’s high school students, relative to either a few years or a...
Robotic surgery is no better than traditional surgery, study finds

Robotic surgery is no better than traditional surgery, study finds

Robotic-assisted procedures have now become ubiquitous in some kinds of surgeries. What once was seen as a technological marvel is commonplace in many hospitals. But studies in recent years have shown robotic surgery performs no better than traditional surgery - even though it comes at a steeper cost to the overall health-care system. The latest comparison study was published in the medical journal...
Artificial trans fats, widely linked to heart disease, now banned

Artificial trans fats, widely linked to heart disease, now banned

Once ubiquitous in everything from frozen pizza to coffee creamer to popcorn, artificial trans fats are now officially banished from U.S. restaurants and grocery stores. Food-makers have had three years to phase out the ingredient, which the Food and Drug Administration ruled unsafe to eat in 2015. Nutrition researchers and public health advocates long ago found artificial trans fats, a modified form...
Higher vitamin D levels linked to lower colorectal cancer risk

Higher vitamin D levels linked to lower colorectal cancer risk

Higher concentrations of vitamin D circulating in the bloodstream are linked to a lower risk of colorectal cancer, according to a large international study published Thursday. The researchers said the results strengthen the evidence that the vitamin may play a protective role against the disease, which is the third-most common cancer in the United States, killing more than 50,000 people a year. Previous...
Drug-induced 'excited delirium' causes police to issue warning after pair of bizarre incidents

Drug-induced 'excited delirium' causes police to issue warning after pair of bizarre incidents

A Florida police department issued a warning to the public Friday about the dangers of drug-induced "excited delirium," one day after two men were apprehended  behaving in an erratic manner in separate incidents. >> Read more trending news  Melbourne police were called shortly after 9:45 a.m. Thursday on reports of a man hiding behind trees and running back and forth across...
CDC warning swimmers to beware of waterborne illnesses

CDC warning swimmers to beware of waterborne illnesses

Summer fun means water. But be careful. In a study released Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reminded Americans that the bodies of water they play in can sometimes make them sick. >> Read more trending news  From 2000 to 2014, the years of the study, voluntary reporting from 35 states and Guam turned up nearly 5,000 reports of sickness — and two deaths &mdash...
Who should be screening moms for postpartum depression? More doctors now can

Who should be screening moms for postpartum depression? More doctors now can

The postpartum depression that can follow having a baby can catch many families off guard and become worrisome not just for the mom experiencing it, but for the baby whose mother might have excessive worries about that baby’s safety or feel a lack of connection to her baby. That maternal bond is important in the first few years of life as babies learn that if I smile...
Commentary: Why you shouldn’t panic when you see a kid in an idle car

Commentary: Why you shouldn’t panic when you see a kid in an idle car

Every couple of weeks, I get an email time-stamped 2 or 3 a.m. because the sender can’t sleep. Here’s one that came three weeks ago: “Dear Lenore: I am a special police officer in Washington, DC. I wake up (at) 4 am to work 6 am-6 pm and get home by 8 pm. No family at all. No support. Never been arrested or anything. Don’t drink. Don’t smoke. Don’t date. Don&rsquo...
Russian rock star kicked off plane over bad body odor dies of tissue-eating disease

Russian rock star kicked off plane over bad body odor dies of tissue-eating disease

A popular Russian rock guitarist was booted off a Transavia Airlines flight after passengers and crew members were sickened by an extreme odor coming from his body, has died, according to news reports. >> Read more trending news  The flight in late May, which departed from Spain’s Canary Islands, made an emergency landing in Portugal, where Andrey Suchilin, 58, was removed...
Austin mom shares her experience of when her child almost drown

Austin mom shares her experience of when her child almost drown

Fourth of July is almost upon us. This week and all summer long, we head to pools, to lakes, to any body of water we can get into with our families to cool off from the heat. But a fun day in the water can turn tragic in a few minutes time. Teddy Van Winkle, 3, almost drown in June when he went after a beach ball in a neighborhood pool. Tina Van Winkle Tina Van Winkle learned firsthand...
Can shaving cream take sting out of sunburn? One mom says yes

Can shaving cream take sting out of sunburn? One mom says yes

A mom from Texas says she has the perfect cure for sunburns. It’s a simple can of shaving cream.  Cindie Allen-Stewart swears by the lather to take the redness and heat out of the summer sun. As soon as she, her children or her husband spend too much time in the sun without enough sunscreen, she puts a thick layer of menthol foam shaving cream on the burn, ”Inside Edition” reported...
Austin girl playing Carnegie Hall Friday with students from Orpheus Academy of Music seven years after stroke

Austin girl playing Carnegie Hall Friday with students from Orpheus Academy of Music seven years after stroke

How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Well, for the more than 40 kids from Austin, it’s taking lessons from Orpheus Academy of Music and lining up to get one of the slots in Orpheus’ first Carnegie Hall concert. The classical music school is celebrating its 15th anniversary in a big way with this concert on Friday at the famed New York City venue. Klondike Steadman director...
A hot weekend ahead of family fun in Austin, June 29-July 1

A hot weekend ahead of family fun in Austin, June 29-July 1

It’s going to be hot, hot, hot this weekend as June turns into July. Find these fun family events in and around Austin: FRIDAY Blanton Museum. Each summer, the Blanton brings creative programs for different age groups that have you learning about art as well as making it:  Deeper Dives for ages 8-10, 10 a.m. Fridays;  Free Diving for...
How to know if your child has ADHD and what to know about the condition

How to know if your child has ADHD and what to know about the condition

You may have heard of ADHD as a joke about a jittery co-worker who's "hyper" or a forgetful friend "having ADD." You may have even heard talks about the debate over the number of kids who take Ritalin or other meds for ADHD. But exactly what is ADHD? >> Read more trending news  A strict medical definition can help parents understand what their child is facing, and also...
Amid complaints, Texas panel scrutinizes companies who run Medicaid

Amid complaints, Texas panel scrutinizes companies who run Medicaid

For-profit companies paid by the state to coordinate services for Medicaid patients have denied disabled Texans critical care, advocates and families told state lawmakers Wednesday. The House General Investigating and Ethics Committee and a subcommittee of the House Appropriations Committee heard hours of testimony, including from the Texas Health and Human Services Commission and the private companies...
Insulin pills could replace daily injections for Type I diabetics, study finds

Insulin pills could replace daily injections for Type I diabetics, study finds

As many as 40 million people around the world have Type 1 diabetes, and many of them have to prick themselves with a needle twice a day to ensure their blood sugar levels are in check. >> Read more trending news  But researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have now developed an oral delivery method that could replace the painful insulin...
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