Health

Child obese? It could be the mom’s fault, study says

Child obese? It could be the mom’s fault, study says

Moms, when it comes to your child’s weight, you matter. A new study in the British Medical Journal confirms this. The study looked at more than 24,000 children of more than 16,000 nurses enrolled in the Nurses Health Study II in the 1990s. The researchers specifically looked at children who were not obese before age 9 and where they were at age 14. Families and birds...
Food additives may harm children’s health

Food additives may harm children’s health

Families should reduce exposure to synthetic chemicals found in food colorings, preservatives, and packaging materials as a growing body of research show they may harm children’s health, according to a policy statement and technical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics released online recently. The statement also suggests improvements to the food additives regulatory system including...
A quarter of adults with sprained ankles were prescribed opioids in ER

A quarter of adults with sprained ankles were prescribed opioids in ER

A quarter of the adults who went to hospital emergency departments with sprained ankles were prescribed opioid painkillers, a new study shows, in another sign of how commonly physicians turn to narcotics even for minor injuries. The state-by-state review revealed wide variation in the use of opioids for the sprains, from 40 percent in Arkansas to 2.8 percent in North Dakota. All but one of the nine...

Alan Alda on Parkinson’s: ‘It hasn’t stopped my life at all’

Actor Alan Alda, known for his roles on “M.A.S.H.,” “The West Wing” and “The Aviator,” recently announced that he has Parkinson’s disease. Speaking on “CBS This Morning,” Alda said he has had “a full life” since he received the diagnosis 3 1/2 years ago. “I’ve acted. I’ve given talks. I help at the Alda Center for...
What scientists are learning about addiction

What scientists are learning about addiction

PHILADELPHIA — None of us has the brain we were born with. Brains grow and adapt. This process, called neuroplasticity, doesn’t end when you step out of the classroom. Even habits — reaching for cookies when stressed out, keeping your head down during staff meetings — cut “trails” in the brain throughout life that can be hard to overcome. When it comes to drug habits...
Eating late at night could put you at risk for cancer, study finds

Eating late at night could put you at risk for cancer, study finds

What time of day you eat could make a difference when it comes to cancer. A new study of from Spain that was done from 2008-2013 on 1,826 people who had either prostate cancer or breast cancer and 2,193 people who did not asked about how close to bedtime people ate meals. The study was published in the  International Journal of Cancer in July. What it found...
5 things to know about mosquitoes, West Nile virus in Central Texas

5 things to know about mosquitoes, West Nile virus in Central Texas

West Nile virus was back in the headlines in the past two weeks because more samples of mosquitoes in Central Texas have tested positive for the virus, so here are five things to know about the health threat: 1. It’s in skeeters: This week, mosquitoes tested positive for the virus in Taylor and in Cedar Park. The positive sample in Taylor was taken July 27 from a trap near Robinson...
3 of 4 local Obamacare providers seek to raise premiums in 2019

3 of 4 local Obamacare providers seek to raise premiums in 2019

Three of the four health insurers offering plans in the Austin area under the Affordable Care Act are angling to raise premiums in 2019 — with the nonprofit provider created by Travis County’s health district pushing for the largest rate increase by far. Sendero Health Plans, an offshoot of taxpayer-supported Central Health, has requested a 33 percent rise in premiums for next year, saying...
Eating insects, like crickets, might sound gross, but it could be good for your gut

Eating insects, like crickets, might sound gross, but it could be good for your gut

Chicken, beans, and eggs are all good sources of protein. Crickets are too, and the little bugs may also be good for your gut, according to a new report.  >> Read more trending news  Researchers from the University of Wisconsin, Madison recently conducted a study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, to determine how eating insects, which contain vitamins, minerals...
Pedal all the way to Alaska? These students did – for a good cause

Pedal all the way to Alaska? These students did – for a good cause

This year’s Texas 4000 riders will roll into Anchorage on Friday. Photo courtesy Texas 4000   Sixty-nine University of Texas students who pedaled out of Austin earlier this summer are expected to roll into Anchorage tomorrow, wrapping up their 70-day quest to raise awareness about cancer. A documentary about their venture, “Texas 4000,” will air at 8 p.m. tonight...
Women more likely to survive heart attacks with female doctors, large review finds

Women more likely to survive heart attacks with female doctors, large review finds

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States, according to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  >> Read more trending news  And previous research has shown that when it comes to medical care for one of the major symptoms of heart disease − heart attack − women fare much worse compared to men. In fact, in a study...
Calls for more drug treatment coverage on final opioid crisis hearing

Calls for more drug treatment coverage on final opioid crisis hearing

On the final day of testimony before Texas lawmakers on the opioid crisis, Rodolfo Morales, a doctor from San Antonio, described the moment seven years ago when he found his 21-year-old son dead from a drug overdose in his bedroom. A Boy Scout and musician, Morales’ son — unlike many — had access to health insurance and good treatment options. But it was not enough to save his life...
Opioid-like antidepressant poisoning people, CDC warns; What is tianeptine?

Opioid-like antidepressant poisoning people, CDC warns; What is tianeptine?

Researchers at The Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued a warning about the federally-unapproved antidepressant tianeptine. >> Read more trending news  Poison control centers across the United States reported an increased number of calls between 2014-2017, “suggesting a possible emerging public health risk,” CDC researchers wrote in...
Heart transplant recipient competes in Transplant Games, her living donor was there too

Heart transplant recipient competes in Transplant Games, her living donor was there too

A rare medical procedure has linked two women forever through their hearts, and the two were able to celebrate their health and their transplants together in Utah this past weekend. Linda Karr, 55, was born with a heart defect and was put on a transplant list two years go, KTVX reported.  Tammy Griffin has cystic fibrosis. Her heart shifted and she was in need of a double heart-lung transplant...

Get kids with food allergies ready for back to school with these tips

When your kid has a food allergy, diabetes or another life-threatening condition, back to school can be stressful. What will happen if your kid with a peanut allergy accidentally sits next to the kid with the peanut butter and jelly sandwich and gets exposed to peanut butter? What will happen if your kid with celiac disease is offered a birthday cupcake or is told something...
Treatment options for drug use severely lacking in Texas, experts say

Treatment options for drug use severely lacking in Texas, experts say

The consensus was clear at the state Capitol among criminal justice and Child Protective Services professionals facing the nation’s opioid crisis: Texas needs more treatment options. Experts who work in courts, probation and the foster care system say people with substance use problems often suffer devastating consequences while trying to get into rehabilitation centers, including overdoses...
Parents, watch for West Nile virus, school district, Austin health department warns

Parents, watch for West Nile virus, school district, Austin health department warns

Last night, we got this message from Austin Public Health and Austin Independent School District: This follows news that mosquitoes in Cedar Park tested positive for West Nile. In July, Travis County was put on alert for one West Nile case. RELATED: Five things to know about West Nile Virus Looking for ideas on how to prevent mosquitoes? Last year we tested 16 repellents...
Texas criminal justice professionals push for more treatment options to fight opioid crisis

Texas criminal justice professionals push for more treatment options to fight opioid crisis

5:30 p.m. update: Criminal justice and child protective services professionals told legislators Tuesday that the state is severely lacking in treatment services to combat the opioid crisis and other substance use problems. Experts who work in jails, probation and the foster care system say people often have overdoses, end up being arrested or suffer other devastating consequences while...
Back to school: Are your child’s vaccinations current?

Back to school: Are your child’s vaccinations current?

Every year, there are kindergarten and seventh-grade parents ready to send their kids off for the first day of school who have to turn around and head to the doctor’s office. Either they need proof of vaccination or they are missing a required vaccination or the exemption form to opt out of vaccines (which is never a good idea unless there’s a medical...
Mosquitoes trapped in Cedar Park test positive for West Nile virus

Mosquitoes trapped in Cedar Park test positive for West Nile virus

Mosquitoes trapped in Cedar Park this month have tested positive for the West Nile virus, city officials announced Monday. The species that tested positive, culex quinquefasciatus (southern house mosquito), was collected Thursday in southwest Cedar Park, near the intersection of Cypress Creek Road and Sun Chase Boulevard, officials said. The species has a flight range of about one mile. Because the...
After heart surgery, an athlete gets back to running marathons

After heart surgery, an athlete gets back to running marathons

A year and a half ago, Alex Glarakis wrapped up a 19-mile run and headed directly to a party at the Greek church he attends. “We started dancing and dancing and dancing, and before I knew it I was on the floor,” the 64-year-old IT security specialist at IBM said. Glarakis hadn’t bothered to eat after his run, so when he passed out, he at first blamed improper nutrition or dehydration...
A healthier heart may mean a healthier mind, new study shows

A healthier heart may mean a healthier mind, new study shows

It turns out maintaining low blood pressure does not just help prevent heart attacks — it can also keep your mind sharp. Research presented in July at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Chicago found that at-risk people whose blood pressure was kept lower than the recommended level had a significant reduction in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the precursor to dementia...
Mayo Clinic introduces first-aid skill for Amazon Alexa

Mayo Clinic introduces first-aid skill for Amazon Alexa

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic has introduced a new skill for Amazon Alexa, giving a hands-free way to access first-aid information. A skill is a new capability a person can add to their Amazon Alexa-enabled devices which creates a more personalized user experience. Once enabled by the user, the new Mayo Clinic First-Aid skill for Amazon Alexa can provide voice-driven, self-care instructions...
Study: Using sunscreen in childhood cuts melanoma risk years later

Study: Using sunscreen in childhood cuts melanoma risk years later

Slather that sunscreen on your kids and don’t hold back. It could help save their lives. A study out of Australia found that using sunscreen in childhood can reduce the risk of developing melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, by 40 percent in young adults. As with most cancers, the risk of melanoma increases with age. But according to the American Cancer Society, melanoma is one of the...
Hand sanitizers becoming less effective against some bacteria, study finds 

Hand sanitizers becoming less effective against some bacteria, study finds 

Hand sanitizers are generally a great way to keep germs at bay, but they are becoming less effective, according to a new report.  >> Read more trending news  While the disinfectants have helped battle staph infections and some drug-related bacteria in patients, Australian doctors have noticed a rise in hospital-acquired infections of enterococcus faecium, a bacteria that...
Austin police reviewing mental health services amid mounting stress

Austin police reviewing mental health services amid mounting stress

Six years. That’s how long Austin police Cpl. Javier Bustos said it took to heal the trauma from a night in 2010 when he shot 26-year-old Patrick Allen Faith in the line of duty. Faith was on Texas 71 near Riverside Drive approaching an oncoming vehicle with a gun when Bustos hit him in the shoulder. Faith then turned his gun and killed himself. Even though Bustos did not fire the fatal shot...
Hope for peanut allergies? Pills, patches, even nuts are being studied

Hope for peanut allergies? Pills, patches, even nuts are being studied

Every year, Americans make 30,000 emergency room visits because of food allergies, according to the Food and Drug Administration. Even touching a surface that previously held peanuts can trigger anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction. When a peanut-allergic person starts feeling their throat close up, they stab themselves with an epinephrine, or adrenaline, device and then head to the ER...
Facebook comments: Aug. 3, 2018

Facebook comments: Aug. 3, 2018

As reported by the American-Statesman’s Julie Chang, a poll by the Texas Lyceum found that most Texans disapprove of how Congress and the federal government handle the country’s health care issues despite supporting the Medicaid and Medicare programs. “Of the 1,178 adult Texans polled, 71 percent said they had little or no trust in the federal government to do what’s best for...
Chipotle illnesses: More than 400 report sickness after eating at Ohio restaurant

Chipotle illnesses: More than 400 report sickness after eating at Ohio restaurant

An Ohio Chipotle Mexican Grill has reopened after reports of illness caused the restaurant to voluntarily shut its doors Monday. As of 8 a.m. Wednesday, the Delaware County Health District had received 413 inquiries from customers who believed the Powell restaurant’s food made them sick, said the district’s public information officer, Traci Whittaker. “Our staff has...
12-year-old boy diagnosed with stiff skin syndrome, family looks for cure

12-year-old boy diagnosed with stiff skin syndrome, family looks for cure

Jaiden Rogers is fighting a condition that will cause him to “become entombed within himself.” Jaiden is 12 and is suffering with stiff skin syndrome. It causes the connective tissue that causes the the skin to harden and makes muscles difficult to move.  He was diagnosed in 2013 after his father found a hard lump on the child’s thigh, Fox News reported. It has spread...
Wraps, salads sold at Kroger, Trader Joe's recalled over possible parasite

Wraps, salads sold at Kroger, Trader Joe's recalled over possible parasite

Have you recently picked up a salad or wrap from the grocery store? It could make you sick, according to a new health alert. The Food Safety and Inspection Service said Monday that "beef, pork and poultry salad and wrap products" recently distributed by Indianapolis-based Caito Foods may be contaminated with a parasite called cyclospora. The products, produced July 15-18, have "sell...
Man's limbs amputated after dog's lick likely caused bacterial infection

Man's limbs amputated after dog's lick likely caused bacterial infection

A Wisconsin man's limbs were amputated after doctors said he contracted a bacterial infection – likely from a dog's lick. According to WITI, Greg Manteufel, 48, of West Bend, believed he had the flu when he went to the emergency room in late June. But doctors later determined that capnocytophaga, a type of bacteria found in dog saliva, had caused the infection that left him bruised, dropped...
Longhorned tick: New invasive species found in more states

Longhorned tick: New invasive species found in more states

A new invasive tick species has been confirmed in Pennsylvania for the first time, just weeks after agriculture officials found one in North Carolina. According to the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, recent testing found an Asian longhorned tick on a deer in Pennsylvania’s Centre County, where Penn State is. This particular species is tough to tell apart from others. As the name suggests...
Texans give Congress low marks on handling of health care, poll says

Texans give Congress low marks on handling of health care, poll says

Most Texans disapprove of how Congress and the federal government are handling the country’s health care issues despite supporting the Medicaid and Medicare programs, according to a poll by the Texas Lyceum released Tuesday. Of the 1,178 adult Texans polled, 71 percent said they had little or no trust in the federal government to do what’s best for Texans when it comes to health care....
Just two weeks of inactivity can trigger onset diabetes in at-risk patients, study finds

Just two weeks of inactivity can trigger onset diabetes in at-risk patients, study finds

A lack of physical activity can have an impact on your health. It can lead to obesity, depression and can even trigger diabetic symptoms among at-risk patients, according to a new report.  >> Read more trending news  Researchers from McMaster University in Canada recently conducted a small study, published in the Journals of Gerontology, to determine how inactivity can impair...
Commentary: How America can birth a just and loving world

Commentary: How America can birth a just and loving world

Like many mothers, I feel the intense pain that families are facing when they are separated from their children, as we witnessed recently in Texas, in the flood of parents fleeing violence and persecution in their home countries. But those of us who work as midwives with Mama Sana Vibrant Woman, a community organization in Austin, are getting an up-close look at more horrifying dimensions of separations...
Poll: Most Texans dislike how Congress, the feds handle health care

Poll: Most Texans dislike how Congress, the feds handle health care

Most Texans disapprove of how Congress and the federal government are handling the country’s health care issues despite supporting the Medicaid and Medicare programs, according to a poll by the Texas Lyceum released Tuesday. Of the 1,178 adult Texans polled, 71 percent said they had little or no trust in the federal government to do what’s best for Texans when it comes to health care....
Care tenuous for Texas children on Medicaid managed care plans

Care tenuous for Texas children on Medicaid managed care plans

At least four Austin-area pediatric specialists in recent months notified their patients they would stop serving children with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas Medicaid plans after complaints that the company had failed to pay the providers for certain services. One practice, Central Texas Pediatric Orthopedics, the only specialist of its kind in the Austin area that accepts Medicaid, is finalizing...

Virtual reality can help people overcome fear of heights, study shows

Researchers have found virtual reality exercises can help alleviate a fear of heights, showing the technology can be used as an accessible, affordable tool in mental health treatment. The study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal, was the first to use virtual reality without a therapist — a concept researchers say could be the future of mental health treatment for a variety of problems...
5 food-safety slips that can ruin summer cookouts

5 food-safety slips that can ruin summer cookouts

It’s challenging for me to completely relax at a typical backyard cookout or pool party because I feel I have been endowed with a burdensome superpower: I see food-safety blunders. As I scan the sunny scene of revelers in shorts and sundresses clinking glasses of rosé and nibbling finger foods, the radar in my mind inevitably homes in on a hot spot. The host is basting steaks on the grill...
Urgent care clinics are prescribing too many unnecessary antibiotics

Urgent care clinics are prescribing too many unnecessary antibiotics

Nearly half of patients who go to urgent care clinics seeking treatment for a flu, cold or other conditions that don’t require antibiotics received a prescription for one anyway. That’s three times as often as antibiotics are prescribed to patients with the same illnesses in traditional doctors’ offices, according to a study published Monday. Patients who get unnecessary antibiotics...

Alcohol-related liver deaths have increased sharply

Deaths from liver disease have increased sharply in recent years in the United States, according to a study published in the British Medical Journal. Cirrhosis-related deaths increased by 65 percent from 1999 to 2016, and deaths from liver cancer doubled, the study said. The rise in death rates was driven predominantly by alcohol-induced disease, the report said. Over the past decade, people ages...
Mammograms or primary care? Future of Big Pink Bus up in the air

Mammograms or primary care? Future of Big Pink Bus up in the air

Marva Overton, executive director of the Alliance for African American Health in Central Texas, thought it was a bit strange in February when the Seton Healthcare Family rescheduled a couple of events that were expected to include the Big Pink Bus, its free, mobile mammography unit. Her organization, among others, had been working with the hospital network for the past five years to screen women for...
CDC study shows what AIDS advocates already knew about gay black men and HIV

CDC study shows what AIDS advocates already knew about gay black men and HIV

On any given day, the health staff with the AIDS Healthcare Foundation is out making the rounds at nightclubs, community festivals, concerts and area colleges and universities, any place black gay men are known to congregate. >> Read more trending news  They and AID Atlanta have been doing this work via Mobile Testing Units for years in an effort to reach those most at-risk of HIV-infections...
Commentary: There’s not just one opioid crisis in Texas. There’s many

Commentary: There’s not just one opioid crisis in Texas. There’s many

Could the heavy media coverage of the national opioid epidemic be drawing attention and resources away from chronic mortality associated with other drugs of abuse? Recent news articles — like “We are not immune: how the opioid crisis is hitting central Texas,” published by the Statesman — amplify municipal and state calls for funding to fight this narrow battle at the expense...
Editorial: Budget savings shouldn’t come at Texas foster kids’ expense

Editorial: Budget savings shouldn’t come at Texas foster kids’ expense

Faced with mounting anecdotal evidence that some foster children in Texas aren’t getting the medical services they need under the state’s Medicaid system, officials have started to quantify the scope of the problem. The early numbers are distressing — and they underscore the need for the Legislature to provide more funding and better safeguards for foster children in this critical...
Summer camp for scientists

Summer camp for scientists

Area high school and middle school students experienced science and health professions through the Health Sciences Summer Camp hosted by Dell Medical School at the University of Texas. In the same simulation labs where medical and nursing students train, camp participants learned basic clinical skills such as administering IVs, performing intubations, drawing blood and taking vital signs. Nearly 80...
Is fruit juice healthy for kids? Expert weighs in

Is fruit juice healthy for kids? Expert weighs in

Last year, the American Academy of Pediatrics updated its guidelines on fruit juice, cautioning parents against serving the drink to their babies for at least one year.  » RELATED: Here’s how much fruit juice children should drink, according to new guidelines “Parents may perceive fruit juice as healthy, but it is not a good substitute for fresh fruit and just packs...
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