5 things to know about corrections to Austin’s CodeNext maps


On Monday, the city of Austin rolled out thousands of corrections to its draft zoning map for CodeNEXT, its three-year effort to rewrite the city’s entire land use code. It is the first change to the maps since they were released last month.

Five things you need to know about the new maps and what is ahead for CodeNEXT:

1. What happened? According to a CodeNEXT spokeswoman, the staff at Austin’s planning division identified about 2,200 properties in various parts of the city that were improperly zoned on the draft map.

2. How were they improperly zoned? Several things were identified as errors or omissions. For example, schools were improperly mapped as “transect zones,” a broad designation that can range from dense urban to rural. Numerous properties weren’t zoned at all because of a glitch in software, and some required slight revisions.

3. Does this delay the CodeNEXT roll out? Fixing the map will not delay the code’s review and adoption, a CodeNEXT spokeswoman said. City officials plan to take the code before the City Council in December. Many of its critics have asked for the process to be slowed.

4. What’s next? The next big milestone is July 7, the staff deadline for comments on the map draft that will sent to the Planning and the Zoning and Platting commissions. The City Council will a public look at the code in June.

5. Where can I learn more? The city has scheduled public meetings, including one in District 1 on Saturday. Four more district meetings are scheduled next week. The city has a website where the map, with current and proposed zoning for all of Austin, is available for viewing. The map and the full schedule of events are at www.austintexas.gov/department/CodeNEXT.



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