Del Valle school board member takes on longtime Travis commissioner


A Del Valle school district board member promising to bring renewed energy will face off against longtime Travis County Commissioner Margaret Gómez in the Democratic primary March 6 to represent southeastern Travis County.

But Susanna Woody faces an uphill battle. Gómez has the name recognition that comes with serving as the Precinct 4 commissioner since 1995. She’s surpassed Woody in fundraising by more than $28,000 and has outspent her by more than $12,000, according to campaign finance filings.

Gómez’s seat is the only contested one among the Commissioners Court positions up for election next year. Travis County Judge Sarah Eckhardt and Commissioner Brigid Shea did not draw challengers.

With no Republican opponent in November, the winner of the Democratic primary in Precinct 4 will likely take the seat.

Woody said an incumbent’s years of experience are only worth what an officeholder makes of them. She said Gómez has been an ineffective advocate for her constituents and become “complacent.”

IN OTHER PRIMARY RACES: New 459th district judge’s seat draws three candidates

“Precinct 4 has been neglected for a very long time,” Woody said about why she decided to run. “I just felt that we needed active, connected representation to get things done in the area. … She’s had 23 years to get that together.”

Woody, who has been a school board member for about seven years, said she has seen firsthand how issues like lack of access to healthy food affected students but was limited in her role with how she could help.

As a commissioner, Woody said, she could take a more active role in improving life for eastern Travis County residents. Her top concerns, she said, are creating transportation options, increasing health services and eliminating the food desert by bringing more food options to the area.

Woody said she wants to see more and wider roads and better public transit so residents aren’t forced to have to take a toll road or deal with excessive commute times. She said she would work with partners at the city of Austin, Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization and other entities to come up with ideas.

Gómez said much of her work is done behind the scenes.

This year, for example, after she and other officials toured Del Valle, she said the county and Central Health, the county’s health care district, came up with an idea to create a Del Valle clinic by lending out the Travis County Employee Healthcare Clinic site on FM 973 for two days a week. The need for health care services in the area has been dire since the abrupt closure of the Del Valle CommUnityCare clinic in May 2016.

“I just don’t think she understands how some of these solutions work,” Gómez said. “They don’t call for press conferences or press releases. They just call for meetings consistently until all the kinks get worked out.”

RELATED: Residents sue Central Health over funding of UT Dell Medical School

She also said the county can’t take the lead on every issue. Health care issues, for example, are primarily the responsibility of Central Health, the county’s health care district. The county oversees that agency’s budget, but aside from that, the commissioners have little say over Central Health’s decision-making.

Gómez cites among her accomplishments the voters’ approval of a $185 million bond package in 2017, with projects primarily benefiting areas east of Interstate 35, as well as funding raised for flood plain improvements using nonvoter- approved certificates of obligation. One of the biggest items in last year’s bond package included $9.5 million to build a four-lane divided road to eventually connect an extended South Pleasant Valley Road from FM 1327 to Bradshaw Road.

Seeing these projects through to completion was a major reason that Gómez decided to run again, she said.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Politics

From JFK to Omarosa: The White House Situation Room’s history-making moments
From JFK to Omarosa: The White House Situation Room’s history-making moments

In the spring of 1961, John Kennedy's White House had a situation, but no Situation Room. Kennedy had just endured the attempted Bay of Pigs invasion in Cuba, a fast-moving fiasco that left the president frustrated at the confused flow of intelligence into the Oval Office.  And so, putting his own Naval aide in charge of construction, a group...
‘Don’t run this year’: The perils for Republican women facing a flood of resistance
‘Don’t run this year’: The perils for Republican women facing a flood of resistance

Diane Harkey, the Republican candidate for California’s 49th Congressional District, recognizes that President Donald Trump “doesn’t make women real comfortable.”  Men just have a different style, she said: “They’re more warrior-oriented. We are a little more consensus-builders.”  But she laughs off...
Tired of money in politics, some Democrats think small
Tired of money in politics, some Democrats think small

Like many political candidates, Dean Phillips spends hours each day fundraising and thanking his donors. But because he refuses to accept PAC money from corporations, unions or other politicians, he has adopted a unique approach.  “Norbert?” he asked on the doorstep of a man who’d donated $25 to his campaign. “I’m...
Trump attacks Kasich over Ohio race — and Kasich welcomes the attention
Trump attacks Kasich over Ohio race — and Kasich welcomes the attention

President Donald Trump taunted Ohio Gov. John Kasich on Monday, asserting that his increasingly vocal Republican rival is "very unpopular" and a "failed presidential candidate," and to blame for the narrow margin in last week's special congressional election in the state.  Kasich responded with an impish tweet: an image of...
‘Immigration hypocrite’: Stephen Miller’s uncle lambastes him in scathing op-ed
‘Immigration hypocrite’: Stephen Miller’s uncle lambastes him in scathing op-ed

Wolf-Leib Glosser fled violence from his small Eastern European village and, with $8 to his name, came to Ellis Island. His children soon followed, and his children's children were born in the American city of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, where the family grew and prospered.  Such is what "chain migration" was like at the turn of the 20th...
More Stories