Anti-CodeNext PAC says it has the signatures to trigger election


Highlights

The PAC IndyAustin announced Monday night that it has collected 24,000 signatures.

The referendum will ask voters if they want a say in large-scale changes to the city’s land development code.

The referendum could make CodeNext a dominant issue in re-election campaigns of the mayor and council members.

The group pushing for CodeNext to be placed on the ballot has announced that it has the petition signatures to trigger an election.

At Austin Energy’s headquarters, organizers from IndyAustin, the billboard company-backed political action committee that began the petition effort, announced Monday night that in the past six months, its volunteers and staff have gathered about 24,700 signatures. About 20,000 signatures are needed to trigger an election.

IndyAustin’s head, Bastrop resident Linda Curtis, said the group will file when it collects 28,300 signatures to ensure that it has at least 20,000 valid signatures. Curtis said she aims to file petitions with the Austin city clerk’s office on March 22.

“We absolutely can make it and will make it,” said Curtis, who has been involved in several petition efforts in Austin, including a 2007 petition to stop subsidies for the Domain. “The question is the date.”

IndyAustin and the nonprofit group Community Not Commodity have been gathering signatures since last year. If certified, the petition would give voters a yes or no choice on whether they should have a say in any large-scale rewrites to the city’s land use code.

If that measure passes in November, a separate referendum would be held next year on CodeNext, the city’s proposed land use and zoning plan.

Five City Council members and Mayor Steve Adler will be up for re-election in the November general election. Adding a CodeNext voting referendum to that ballot could make the city’s rewrite of the entire land use and zoning code the dominant issue facing the council members’ campaigns for another term.

CodeNext is the city’s attempt to implement the recommendations of the 2012 Imagine Austin comprehensive plan by revising what type of development can go where. The effort aims to address many of Austin’s problems, including a lack of low-income housing as well as gentrification and traffic congestion.

Opponents of CodeNext believe that it will destroy neighborhood character by encouraging redevelopment and demolitions of homes. Proponents believe that CodeNext will make housing cheaper by making it easier to build in the city.



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