Kopser, Roy have big cash advantages over rivals in CD 21 runoffs


Highlights

Both the Republican and Democratic runoffs for CD 21 have candidates with a lot more money than their rivals.

Mary Wilson narrowly led in the March Democratic primary while being outspent by Joseph Kopser.

Chip Roy, the better-financed GOP candidate, led Matt McCall and 16 other rivals in the first round of voting.

Joseph Kopser has a 23-1 cash advantage over Mary Wilson going into the homestretch of their runoff race for the Democratic nomination in the 21st Congressional District.

On the Republican side, Chip Roy has a nearly 3-1 cash advantage over rival Matt McCall, campaign finance reports show.

The numbers reflect the latest fundraising totals for each campaign in reports for the period from April 1 to May 2.

In the March 6 Democratic primary in a district that stretches from Central Austin to San Antonio and west into the Hill Country, Wilson finished first in a field of four candidates with 31 percent of the vote. Kopser ran second with 29 percent.

Roy led a field of 18 candidates in the Republican primary with 27 percent of the vote to 17 percent for McCall.

The seat is held by U.S. Rep. Lamar Smith, R-San Antonio, who is not seeking re-election. He supports Roy. McCall had challenged Smith in the Republican primaries in 2014 and 2016, making him the only one of the four candidates in the runoff to have run for elective office before.

Early voting for the May 22 election began Monday.

In the most recent campaign finance report, Wilson, a minister who lives in Austin, raised $27,000, bringing her total fundraising for the cycle to $71,000, plus $26,000 that she loaned her campaign.

Her campaign spent $38,000, including a loan repayment of nearly $6,000, in the last period and $89,000 for the campaign to date, including loan repayments totaling nearly $8,000.

Wilson’s campaign had $10,000 in cash on hand as of May 2.

Kopser, an Austin tech entrepreneur who served 20 years in the Army, raised $61,000 in individual contributions in the most recent period and a little more than $1 million for the cycle. In this last period, the Kopser campaign also received more than $11,000 from the Serve America Victory Fund, a political action committee formed by U.S. Rep. Seth Moulton — a Massachusetts Democrat who served in the Marine Corps — to help elect other Democratic military veterans to Congress.

Kopser’s campaign spent $120,000 from April 1 to May 2 and $921,000 for the cycle. The campaign had $232,000 in cash on hand as of May 2.

Roy, the former chief of staff to U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and former first assistant attorney general under Attorney General Ken Paxton, raised $189,000 in the most recent period and $732,000 for the cycle. His campaign spent $205,000 in the last period and $505,000 altogether. The campaign had $226,000 in the bank as of May 2.

Roy, who lives in Dripping Springs, also benefited from more than $800,000 in spending by Club for Growth Action, a free-market, limited-government super PAC, according to the Center for Responsive Politics in Washington.

McCall, who lives in Boerne and owns a business that provides human tissue for American military hospitals in Europe and Asia, raised $56,000 in the last period and $147,000 for the cycle, plus $114,000 he loaned to his campaign. He spent $52,000 in the last period and $183,000 altogether. His campaign had $79,000 in cash on hand as of May 2.



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