Trump says tougher gun laws not answer after Texas church shooting


President Donald Trump says tougher gun laws would not have prevented a mass shooting at a South Texas church, arguing that more restrictions might have led to more casualties.

Trump spoke Tuesday at a news conference in South Korea where he was asked about “extreme vetting” for gun purchases. Trump said: “If you did what you’re suggesting, there would have been no difference three days ago and you might not have had that very brave person who happens to have a gun or a rifle in his trunk.”

As he did after last month’s Las Vegas massacre of 58 people, Trump pushed back against the question, calling it a “situation that probably shouldn’t be discussed too much” and noted that he was “in the heart of South Korea.”

Trump added that if the good Samaritan didn’t have a gun, “instead of having 26 dead, you would have had hundreds more dead.”

Authorities say Devin Patrick Kelley fired at least 450 rounds of ammunition at worshippers in Sunday’s attack at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs. The dead ranged in age from 18 months to 77 years old.

Trump’s more muted response to gun violence contrasts with his swift call for legislative and military action after the Oct. 31 truck attack in New York. Within hours of a rental truck ramming through a crowded bicycle path and into a school bus, Trump called for Congress to immediately repeal the diversity visa lottery program that suspect Sayfullo Saipov, an Uzbekistan citizen, used to enter the country in 2010.

After the Las Vegas shooting, Trump and aides said it was inappropriate to consider a policy response while people were still grieving. Despite days later, after suggesting openness to outlawing the bump stock device that allowed Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock to fire at near-automatic rates, the Trump administration has shown no signs of urgency.

Trump, who supported gun control before reversing his position when entering the Republican presidential primary race, courted the National Rifle Association’s endorsement in 2016. Earlier this year, he became the first president in three decades to speak at the gun group’s annual convention.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Local

Political ad by Texas war hero running for Congress goes viral
Political ad by Texas war hero running for Congress goes viral

A decorated Air Force veteran is running for Congress, and the Texas Democrat released a political video that went viral since its release Thursday, USA Today reported. >> Read more trending news Mary Jennings “MJ” Hegar, who won a Purple Heart and Distinguished Flying Cross for bravery in Afghanistan, is running for the...
Texas veteran, 79, evicted for failing to pay taxes on home
Texas veteran, 79, evicted for failing to pay taxes on home

A veteran who has lived in a Texas home for decades is homeless after he was unable to pay back taxes and the house was sold at public auction, WFAA reported. >> Read more trending news Billie McGruder turns 80 next month. He has lived in the house his parents bought in the 1930s for decades, but he was evicted Friday, the television station...
Naked man claiming he 'may be Jesus' arrested after trying to start fire 
Naked man claiming he 'may be Jesus' arrested after trying to start fire 

An Indiana man was arrested after he was found naked in the backyard of a Kentucky home after allegedly attempting to start a fire, claiming he “may be Jesus,” Kentucky New Era reported. >> Read more trending news Austin Michael Johnson, 31, was arrested June 18 by Magoffin County Sheriff’s deputies in Johnson Fork, where...
Autonomous cars will be built, but will people get onboard with idea?
Autonomous cars will be built, but will people get onboard with idea?

I tumbled out of bed early one day this week and made it to one of those issues-and-eggs type of breakfasts, this piece of policy jawboning offered by the Urban Land Institute on the topic of autonomous vehicles. Three experts and a moderator worked through the implications and prospects for that particular transportation innovation, and they had some...
TEXAS DIGEST: Heart transplant hospital could lose Medicaid funds

HOUSTON Heart transplant hospital could lose Medicaid A Houston hospital that suspended its heart transplant program for two weeks amid scrutiny following the deaths of two patients could lose federal Medicaid funding. Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center on Friday was notified that Medicare plans to halt funding to its heart transplant program in...
More Stories