Judge denies motion to prevent publishing of 3D-printed gun blueprints


A federal judge in Austin denied on Friday a motion from three gun control groups seeking a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction to stop a gun rights activist from publishing downloadable blueprints online that can be used to manufacture 3D-printed guns.

The Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, Everytown for Gun Safety Action Fund, Inc. and the Giffords Law Center filed a motion for an emergency hearing on Wednesday as a last-minute effort to stop Cody Wilson and his Austin-based nonprofit, Defense Distributed, from publishing the weapon schematics, court documents say.

The gun control groups argued that the creation of “untraceable and undetectable weapons” would threaten national security.

“Once these files are published on the internet, United States national security and its citizens will be irreparably harmed,” the groups argued in their Wednesday filing.

Wilson initially posted the plans for a 3D-printed handgun in 2013, but federal authorities ordered him to take them down. He complied but sued the federal government two years later.

The multi-year lawsuit was settled on June 28 after the plaintiffs, Defense Distributed and the Second Amendment Foundation, and the defendants, the U.S. Department of State, former Secretary of State John Kerry and the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, reached a settlement agreement.

The terms of the agreement allow Wilson to publish and sell files that can be used to print firearms with a 3D-printer.

United States District Court Judge Robert Pitman said Friday that the court found the gun control groups’ “interest in this action is too generalized to establish entitlement to intervention by right,” court documents say.

Wilson and his company plan to republish their downloadable blueprints on Aug. 1, according to their website.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Local

Seven candidates jockey for three Austin school district board seats
Seven candidates jockey for three Austin school district board seats

Three of five Austin school board seats will be contested on the Nov. 6 ballot. Those elected will serve four-year terms for no pay and are tasked with approving the budget, setting the tax rate, establishing policies and evaluating the superintendent. They will also have to wrestle with a shrinking population at the 81,600-student Austin district...
Opponents turn up political heat on Austin’s paid sick leave mandate
Opponents turn up political heat on Austin’s paid sick leave mandate

Six weeks shy of its scheduled implementation, Austin’s paid sick leave ordinance — the first of its kind in Texas — might be on the ropes as attacks on it ramp up. Oct. 1 was to be the day it took effect, mandating that nearly all employers in Austin provide paid sick days to their employees. However, a state appeals court ruling...
New director of Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is familiar
New director of Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is familiar

In a shifting of chairs atop the state environmental agency, a governor-appointed commissioner will now lead the agency staff and a new appointee will take his spot. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality announced Monday that Toby Baker, who was appointed to be a commissioner by then-Gov. Rick Perry in April 2012, is stepping down...
Pflugerville company’s HQ moving to Hutto with help from tax rebate
Pflugerville company’s HQ moving to Hutto with help from tax rebate

A metal company is relocating its headquarters from Pflugerville to Hutto with the help of a tax rebate from the city. Paradigm Metals Inc. agreed with the city of Hutto and Titan Development to invest more than $10 million in a new 100,000-square-foot building at Innovation Business Park, according to a city news release. The groundbreaking will be...
A&M toughens sexual misconduct rules for faculty, staff, students
A&M toughens sexual misconduct rules for faculty, staff, students

The Texas A&M University System announced tougher sanctions Monday, including mandatory expulsion and dismissal in some cases, for students, faculty members and staffers who engage in sexual misconduct. The new rules relate to Title IX, the federal law barring sex discrimination and sexual misconduct at schools receiving federal funds, and take effect...
More Stories