This dish adds flavors of Korea in pork, rice and veggies


Savor the flavors of Korea with this pan-roasted pork coated with a garlicky soy sauce glaze. Sticky, short-grained rice mixed with vegetables is a Korean staple. I’ve adapted this rice recipe to capture Korean flavors and shorten the preparation time.

Sesame oil, rice vinegar and low-sodium soy sauce are used in this dinner. I like to keep them on hand to add Asian flavors to many meat, rice or vegetables dishes.

Helpful hints:

If pressed for time, instead of the rice recipe below, make microwave rice and stir in spinach while rice is still hot.

White vinegar diluted with a little water can be used instead of rice vinegar.

Countdown:

Marinate pork.

Make rice dish

Make pork.

Shopping list:

Here are the ingredients you’ll need for tonight’s Dinner in Minutes.

To buy: 3/4 pound pork tenderloin, 1 small bottle low-sodium soy sauce, 1 small bottle rice vinegar, 1 bottle sesame oil, 1 small bottle honey, 1 small bottle ground ginger, 1 small package white rice, 1 small package bean sprouts, 1 bag washed, ready-to eat spinach.

Staples: Minced garlic, salt and black peppercorns.

Korean Pork

Recipe by Linda Gassenheimer

3/4 lb. pork tenderloin

1 Tbsp. low-sodium soy sauce

2 Tbsp. rice vinegar

1 tsp. minced garlic

3 tsp. sesame oil, divided use

1 Tbsp. honey

1 tsp. ground ginger

Dash of freshly ground black pepper

Remove visible fat from pork and cut into 1-inch slices. Place in a self-seal plastic bag. Add soy sauce, vinegar, garlic, 1 teaspoon sesame oil, honey, ginger and black pepper. Seal the bag and gently shake to combine ingredients. Marinate about 5 minutes while making side dish.

Remove pork from bag and reserve marinade. Heat remaining 2 teaspoons sesame oil in a medium-size nonstick skillet over medium-high heat and add the pork. Saute 2 minutes. Turn and saute 3 minutes. Remove to a plate. A meat thermometer should read 145 degrees. Add the reserved marinade to the skillet and cook 3 to 4 minutes. Spoon sauce over the pork.

Yield 2 servings.

Per serving: 292 calories (32 percent from fat) 10.5 g fat (2.2 g saturated, 4.0 g monounsaturated), 108 cholesterol, 38.6 g protein, 10.7 g carbohydrates, 0.2 g fiber, 349 mg sodium.

Korean-Style Rice and Spinach

Recipe by Linda Gassenheimer

1/2 cup long-grain white rice

1 cup bean sprouts

1 1/4-cups water

2 cups washed, ready-to eat spinach

2 tsp. sesame oil

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Place rice, bean sprouts and water in a saucepan. Bring to a boil and cover with a lid. Boil 10 to 12 minutes. Water should be absorbed and rice cooked. Remove from the heat and add the spinach. Stir to wilt leaves. Add sesame oil and salt and pepper to taste. Toss well.

Yield 2 servings.

Per serving: 231 calories (20 percent from fat) 5.0 g fat (0.8 g saturated, 1.9 g monounsaturated), no cholesterol, 5.7 g protein, 41.2 g carbohydrates, 2.3 g fiber, 29 mg sodium.



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