Recipe of the Week: Hoppin’ John you can make in an Instant Pot


Are you one of the millions of American cooks who either bought or were gifted an Instant Pot last year? This bestselling multi-cooker isn’t the only one on the market, but it’s the brand that has inspired dozens of cookbooks to help you make everyday staples and holiday favorites in this pressure cooker-slow cooker hybrid.

This recipe for Hoppin’ John is from Laura Arnold’s “Instant One-Pot Meals: Southern Recipes for the Modern 7-in-1 Electric Pressure Cooker” (Countryman Press, $21.95), and as you can see, it is unlike a traditional recipe because all of the steps happen in the single appliance, from quick-soaking the black-eyed peas to sauteing the aromatics and bacon before cooking the peas.

Thanks to the multi-functionality of the Instant Pot, the dish cooks in about half an hour. If you want to make it on the stove, you can use the same proportion of ingredients and order of instructions, but the length of time on each step will vary.

Hoppin’ John

This Southern classic side dish is typically made with black-eyed peas. But you can substitute your favorite beans in this recipe. Note: To quick soak peas or beans, rinse them thoroughly and place in the bowl of the pressure cooker with 8 cups of water. Bring to a boil on the Sauté setting. Once boiling, secure the lid and set on Manual with high pressure for 2 minutes. Quick release, drain peas, rinse and set aside.

— Laura Arnold

2 tablespoons olive oil

3 slices bacon, sliced 1/2-inch pieces

1 onion, finely chopped

2 carrots, peeled and small diced

2 stalks celery, small diced

1 green bell pepper, stemmed, seeded and small diced

2 garlic cloves, minced

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 teaspoon fresh thyme or 2 teaspoons dried thyme

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 pound dried black-eyed peas, rinsed and quick soaked (see note) or soaked overnight

3 cups chicken stock

White rice, cooked, to serve

Scallions, thinly sliced, to garnish

Select the Sauté setting and heat the olive oil. Add the bacon and cook until browned and crispy, about 6 minutes. Remove to a plate and set aside. Drain half of the fat and discard. Add the onion, carrots, celery, bell pepper and garlic and cook until almost translucent, about 4 minutes. Add the cayenne, thyme, salt, and pepper and cook an additional minute. Add the black-eyed peas and chicken stock.

Secure the lid and place on Manual with high pressure for 15 minutes. Use quick release. Serve over white rice and garnish with scallions. Serves 4 to 6.

— From “Instant One-Pot Meals: Southern Recipes for the Modern 7-in-1 Electric Pressure Cooker” by Laura Arnold (Countryman Press, $21.95)



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Austin360 Eats

Weekend music picks: Roky Erickson, Nakia and more
Weekend music picks: Roky Erickson, Nakia and more

It’s a great weekend to take in some local faves. OUR TOP PICKS Roky Erickson performs at the SXSW Outdoor Stage at Vic Mathias Shores at SXSW on Saturday March 17, 2018. JAY JANNER / AMERICAN-STATESMAN Friday: Roky Erickson at Barracuda. This gig is a warmup of sorts for the 71-year-old psych rock pioneer’s tour of the East Coast...
Austin restaurant lands on Food & Wine’s 40 Most Important Restaurants of the Past 40 Years
Austin restaurant lands on Food & Wine’s 40 Most Important Restaurants of the Past 40 Years

If you want to take a tour of modern American culinary history, from West Coast to East, you could do a lot worse than starting with Food & Wine magazine’s recently released list of the 40 Most Important Restaurants of the Past 40 Years. It would be a dining tour that would take you from The French Laundry in Yountville...
Beyond Assyrtiko, Greek whites reach for distinction
Beyond Assyrtiko, Greek whites reach for distinction

Among all the little-known grape varieties found in the ancient land of Greece, assyrtiko is the one that seems to have broken through. Yet its surfacing has been tentative. A vanguard of curious and adventurous drinkers recognizes that assyrtiko from the island of Santorini displays many of the characteristics that are associated with great dry white...
Anheuser-Busch on its way to becoming king of craft beer to
Anheuser-Busch on its way to becoming king of craft beer to

A decade ago, Anheuser-Busch made no beer that could legitimately be called “craft.” The nation’s largest beer company dabbled at the edges of the burgeoning craft beer movement, but its backbone remained the brands to which craft beer was largely a reaction — Bud and Bud Light, Natural Light and Michelob Ultra, and whatever...
Velvety, bright, flabby: Stop to consider how wine feels
Velvety, bright, flabby: Stop to consider how wine feels

Road builders and skin care professionals probably spend a fair amount of time thinking about how they can bring some smoothness to whatever it is they’re working on, but the concept probably doesn’t cross the mind of many winemakers. Yet a lot of beginning wine drinkers automatically go to the word “smooth” to describe wines...
More Stories