What do Austin’s fittest folks do to stay in shape?

We asked local athletes to share their healthiest habits.


Highlights

We contacted some of Austin’s fittest residents and asked them to share their best healthy habits.

Among the suggestions? Practice yoga, mix organic fruit with plain yogurt, pedal a stationary bicycle.

Other tips included preparing family meals ahead of time, stair running at Mount Bonnell and eating beets.

What does it take to get fit? Good, healthy habits, of course.

We all know we should eat right and exercise, but what specifically can we do to improve our health? We checked with some of Austin’s fittest folks and asked them what they do regularly to stay in top shape.

Here’s what they told us:

Matthew “HP (Horse Power)” Moore, 26, Austin Huns rugby player

“I like to do yoga the day after a game or the day before, so I know my body is properly stretched out. I like to think of yoga as rewarding my body for what I put it through. My yoga sessions usually last an hour, and I like to go at least twice a week.”

Desiree Berry, 40, elite runner

“I drink herbal tea with lemon throughout the day and spend at least 5 minutes a day focusing on breathing exercises.”

Jack Conger, 22, University of Texas swimmer and Olympian

“I have a beet juice smoothie at our dining hall once a day, or at least every other day. I’ll have some beets, carrots, spinach, maybe some ginger. I like to have plenty of broccoli, green beans and asparagus on my plate if they have it. This year I’ve really tried to stay away from fried food, have more baked foods and stay away from fast food.”

Rachel Rivas, 31, instructor at SoulCycle

“I try to be conscious of what I eat to fuel my body but do not deprive myself from any particular food. If I am craving chocolate, I eat a small piece to satisfy my craving. Moderation is key!”

Matthew Fedor, 34, Camp Gladiator coach

“I know that without consistency, not much of what I do will have an effect on the goals I have set for myself. On a small calendar, I color in each day I have completed a workout. Visually seeing what I accomplished the previous week not only reviews my activity, but motivates me to continue the streak.”

Javito Cisneros, 10, member of Marathon Kids running club at Brentwood Elementary

“My personal fitness motto is, ‘Never say I can’t!’”

Kim Eagle, 44, owner and coach at Earn That Body

“I never eat flavored yogurts. Instead I get plain yogurt and add organic fruit. This gives me the sweet flavor with half the sugar and the added benefit of more fiber.”

Eddie Reese, 75, University of Texas men’s swim coach

“I get on a stationary bike for a minimum of 30 minutes every day of the week.”

Chris Kimbrough, 47, elite runner and mother of six

“As a 47-year-old who runs about 55 to 65 miles a week, I make it a priority to do strength training, core and stability exercises at least five times a week. I honestly believe that is my key to running strong into my 50s.”

Alan Jones, 78, member of Sun City cycling team

“I ride my bike three to five days a week, nearly year-round, depending on companions, weather and current obligations. I rode 7,150 miles last year. I start at 7:30 or 8:30 a.m., break for coffee and get home in time for lunch after 30 to 50 miles.”

Dana McCoy, 34, personal trainer and nutrition specialist

“I take one hour a week to plan out all the meals I am going to cook for my family, including snacks and breakfast. I make sure all the food is prepped in advance, so my cook time is less than 30 minutes each night. Having a nutrition plan for my week helps keep me in line so my activity stays on point.”

Shirley Dean, 83

“Probably the most unique of any of my fitness activities is my morning walk of 3 to 4 miles per day. On the days I do not go to the gym, I drop four times for push-ups. Sometimes to vary the routine I do a monthlong burpee challenge on the walks, doing the same number of burpees as the day of the month.”

Gilbert Tuhabonye, 42, head of Gilbert’s Gazelles running group

“I eat Ugali (traditional food from Burundi, East Africa and Kenya) the night before my long runs. I also eat beets and drink a lot of water throughout the day — before a glass of vino at night!”

Sarah Stewart, 38, kinesiologist

“I run 20 repeats up the stairs at Mount Bonnell weekly. At the end of pushing myself on the stairs, I finish off with five sets of 10 straight leg raises for my core.”



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Lifestyle

What is selfitis? 5 things to know about the obsessive selfie disorder 
What is selfitis? 5 things to know about the obsessive selfie disorder 

The term "selfitis" may have started off as a hoax back in 2014, but now psychologists have warned it's a genuine mental health issue. Researchers form the Nottingham Trent University in the United Kingdom and Thiagarajar School of Management in India actually investigated the social media phenomenon, leading them to create...
Calling all runners – Austin needs your blood
Calling all runners – Austin needs your blood

Members of Team Spiridon log a training run. Photo by Rob Hill   Let’s face it. Most runners tend toward the obsessive when it comes to their health. That’s why a local running coach wants them to donate whole blood or platelets during a drive he’s calling Blood Runs Deep. “It’s as simple as the fact that...
What’s it take to be a professional ballerina? Austin teen featured on PBS Kids show explains
What’s it take to be a professional ballerina? Austin teen featured on PBS Kids show explains

Matilda Solis, 15, started dancing with Ballet Austin when she was 9. The Austin teen recently was featured on the new PBS Kids show “Kid Stew,” which is about kids, for kids and made by kids. Her episode premiered earlier this month and will re-air June 30. Solis now is studying ballet as a student at the School...
Paddlers to traverse 21 miles of Lake Austin for Dam That Cancer
Paddlers to traverse 21 miles of Lake Austin for Dam That Cancer

Stand-up paddleboarders, in front left to right, Liz Kelley, Scott Herz and Rob Koenig float past the Pennybacker Bridge during the 5th annual Tyler’s Dam That Cancer event in 2014. The event raises money for The Flatwater Foundation, a nonprofit that provides access to mental health services for those affected by...
Paddleboarders to traverse 21 miles on Lake Austin for Dam that Cancer
Paddleboarders to traverse 21 miles on Lake Austin for Dam that Cancer

Stand-up paddleboarders, in front left to right, Liz Kelley, Scott Herz and Rob Koenig float past the Pennybacker Bridge during the 5th annual Tyler’s Dam That Cancer event in 2014. The event raises money for The Flatwater Foundation, a nonprofit that provides access to mental health services for those affected by...
More Stories