Allen’s ‘Cafe Society’ follows a string of disappointments


Woody Allen’s “Cafe Society,” which opened the Cannes Film Festival in May, isn’t as good as hoped, and it’s just the latest in a string of ho-hum movies from the once-iconic director. And, yes, it regrettably also features a romance between an older man and a young woman.

The movie takes place in the 1930s, in both New York and Los Angeles, harking back to the days of big-studio domination of Hollywood.

Jesse Eisenberg stars as the Woody Allen stand-in, Bobby, who is tired of working in his father’s jewelry store and longs to make it big in Hollywood. So he sets off, with the hopes of getting a job from his super-agent uncle, Phil (Steve Carell), who at first doesn’t seem too eager to do much for him.

Phil is always on the phone, and he keeps Bobby waiting for “an audience” with him for several weeks, despite the hounding of Bobby’s mother via phone from New York. She’s the Jewish mother, of course, and has all sorts of funny lines: “Live every day like it’s your last, and some day you’ll be right”; when talking about her gangsterish older son, who has changed religions, she says, “First a murderer, then a Christian. What have I done to deserve this?”

But that’s typical Allen shtick. The heart of the story lies in romance. It begins when Bobby finally lands a menial job at his uncle’s agency and is shown around town by his uncle’s secretary, Vonnie (Kristen Stewart). Bobby is immediately smitten, but Vonnie says she has a boyfriend and that although she’s flattered by the attention, the relationship can’t go anywhere.

As you might expect in an Allen movie, the 20-something Vonnie is involved with a married man. But Bobby holds out hope, while Vonnie waits for her lover to divorce his wife.

Bobby eventually finds out the identity of the older man, and it’s a big problem for reasons that would be spoilers to explain. So he heads back to New York to work at his gangster brother’s nightclub. There he meets another woman, also named Veronica or Vonnie (Blake Lively), gets married and starts a family.

But the flame for the first Vonnie lives on.

The cinematography in Los Angeles is gorgeous, capturing the heyday of Hollywood. And it was shot digitally by the legendary Vittorio Storaro. There’s also a cool appearance by Austin’s Kat Edmonson as a nightclub singer.

But there’s something lacking in “Cafe Society.” The romance between Eisenberg and Stewart is believable, but the romance between Stewart and her older lover isn’t. And there’s all sorts of Allen-esque commentary on the shallowness of L.A. — something he’s rather famous for.

Parker Posey, who’s becoming an Allen regular, has an amusing supporting role as a woman who moves in both New York and Los Angeles societies. And Corey Stoll has another good supporting role as Bobby’s gangster brother, Ben.

During comments in Cannes, Allen acknowledged that “years ago, I would have played the part that Jesse is playing. But I would have played it narrower, because I’m a comedian. He’s an actor.”

He also said that he’s a romantic at heart, and that “Cafe Society” was essentially a romance, unlike some of his darker movies, such as “Match Point.” But since this is Woody Allen, the romance and comedy are tinged with inevitable sadness because he says his comic perspective takes into account an “existence that is fraught with cruelty” and other disappointments.

That’s also true of Allen’s movies. This one, however, is a disappointment. It’ll attract the Allen faithful, but not many more. And if Allen keeps making movies like this, his audience will continue to dwindle.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Movies & TV

For this musical, the feet are as important as the beat
For this musical, the feet are as important as the beat

The 1951 film “An American in Paris” was a huge hit in its time, garnering multiple Academy Awards, including ones for best picture and best original screenplay. Given the movie’s enormous success, and its panoply of classic Gershwin tunes, it’s almost surprising that it took more than half a century for the inevitable stage...
The Saturday of Memorial Day weekend features rosé, oysters and more
The Saturday of Memorial Day weekend features rosé, oysters and more

Recreation Float the Moat at NLand Surf Park. NLand will be offering tubing for the first time ever on Memorial Day weekend. You can “float the moat” before or after you spend a session surfing (which is encouraged but not required) and then enjoy a few hours of entertainment. With belly dancing, live music and more, it’s a festive...
Six Austin places, past and present, to commune with Willie
Six Austin places, past and present, to commune with Willie

There are two kinds of people in Austin: Those who remember old Austin and those who will start remembering old Austin in a few years. Wait, that’s not it. Maybe it’s: Those who have allergies and those who will. Well, maybe both of those are true. But what I’m aiming for is this: Those who love Willie Nelson and those who ought to...
Memorial Day weekend events include “Dazed and Confused” pool party
Memorial Day weekend events include “Dazed and Confused” pool party

Art “Regional Fictions.” The name of artists Jamal Cyrus and Julia Barbosa Landois’ exhibit redefines this literary term to examine the lies, falsehoods and omissions present in the lore of a particular geographical region, specifically as it is taught to school children. Their works, both text- and installation-based, mine educational...
Morgan Freeman friend defends actor after misconduct allegations, speaks out against accusers
Morgan Freeman friend defends actor after misconduct allegations, speaks out against accusers

At least eight women have accused actor Morgan Freeman of inappropriate behavior, according to a report from CNN. The women said the behavior happened on and off movie sets. >> Read more trending news  Freeman is an Academy Award-winning actor, but he's also a business owner in Clarksdale, Mississippi. Two blocks around the corner...
More Stories