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’Barefoot Contessa’ Ina Garten shows off fancy $15,500 stove


Barefoot Contessa” Ina Garten just took upgrading your appliances to a whole new level.

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The Food Network star and celebrity chef took to social media last week to show off a new, stunning stove that she just added to the kitchen of her Manhattan apartment.

“First day cooking on my new @lacanche_us range – so much fun!! #NYC#newapartment,” she wrote to followers on Jan. 18.

>> Related: Ladies of ‘The View’ pull no punches when addressing feud between Megyn Kelly and Jane Fonda

The very fancy appliance was custom designed for Garten by Lacanche, a French-owned family business that makes about 50 stoves per year for American customers. According to PEOPLE, Garten went for the “Sully” model (which starts at $13,850) and added two burners, costing an additional $825.

The stove takes about four months to design and build and Garten had to pay extra for shipping, of course.

On Jan. 19, Garten shared the first treat she baked using her new oven. Sharing a photo of freshly baked pistachio meringues, she wrote, “First thing out of the oven – gorgeous Pistachio Meringues inspired by my friend Yotam @ottolenghi !!”

In April 2017, Garten opened up about the decision she and husband Jeffery made to not have children.

“We decided not to have children,” she said at the time. “I really appreciate that other people do and we will always have friends that have children that we are close to but it was a choice I made very early. I really felt, I feel, that I would have never been able to have the life I’ve had. So it’s a choice and that was the choice I made.”

The couple celebrated 49 blissful years of marriage in December.


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