A year after Amazon deal, how has Whole Foods changed?


When Amazon announced a year ago Saturday that it was buying Whole Foods Market, entering the brick and mortar retail industry it had long been destroying, the reaction across the sector was largely consistent: Amazon would dramatically transform the organic grocery chain and take over the industry.

The assumptions made sense. Years of Amazon’s dominance within e-commerce has made it an intimidating force.

But while changes have happened, they have not been as dramatic or fast-moving as some predicted.

So far, the customer experience at a Whole Foods store doesn’t look strikingly different than it did before the Amazon deal.

And Amazon still has ways to go to take over the industry.

To read the full story, visit 512tech.com.



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