Maggio returning to Austin’s airwaves with KLRU gig


Highlights

Maggio’s new title at KLRU is news and public affairs editorial director.

Maggio won’t be seen every night, but she will pop up on special broadcasts from time to time.

One of Austin’s best-known broadcasters is returning to city’s airwaves.

In her new role as KLRU’s news and public affairs editorial director, you won’t see Judy Maggio every night on the local PBS affiliate, but she will pop up on special broadcasts from time to time.

“Now more than ever we know our audiences want to see more local news and public affairs programming on KLRU,” said Sara Robertson, the station’s vice president for production and technology. “And as a locally owned and operated media organization we are uniquely positioned to do this. Having Judy on our team will help us do more to serve our community and tell more stories that matter.”

Maggio’s upcoming contributions will augment KLRU’s already robust local programming lineup, which features “Austin City Limits,” “Arts in Context,” “Central Texas Gardener,” “Civic Summit” and “Overheard with Evan Smith,” as well as national PBS news shows such as “NewsHour” and “Frontline.”

Maggio is well known to Central Texas viewers. She anchored at ABC affiliate KVUE from 1981 to 2003, followed by a stint at CBS affiliate KEYE from 2003 to 2014. After retiring from KEYE, Maggio spent time traveling and volunteering for local organizations, as well as heading up the Engage Breakfast Series for Leadership Austin.

“This is a watershed time in journalism,” Maggio said. “Finding and exploring new ways to engage people in news and issues that truly matter in this community is incredibly exciting, especially at a respected PBS station like KLRU.”

The expansion of KLRU’s news and public affairs program was made possible, the station said, by the Still Water Foundation and a gift from Luci Baines Johnson and Ian Turpin.



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