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5 ways to stay healthy while traveling this year


You’ve waited a long time for your trip, so the last thing you want is to get sick. 

Unfortunately, it can happen, throwing a wrench in your plans or even sidelining you for a few days (or weeks). You can catch a cold, flu or virus anywhere. You can eat something that wasn’t prepared properly.  

It’s important to be prepared so you can do what you set out to do — enjoy your trip.  

Start before you go.  

Staying healthy while traveling starts way before you get to your destination.  

Everyone, (including children), should be up-to-date on the usual childhood vaccinations before embarking on international travel. You should check your immunization status when it comes to tetanus, diphtheria, hepatitis, rubella and mumps. Older adults should have the flu and pneumonia vaccinations.  

Also, make sure your medical insurance is up to date and covers you if leaving the country and then having an emergency.  

Tame the tummy bug.  

When cruise ship passengers get queasy, it’s most likely seasickness. But when hundreds of passenger get sick, it’s time to worry.  

The Centers for Disease Control suggests doing your homework before booking a cruise. Check out the CDC’s website to make sure your ship meets sanitation standards. It doesn’t guarantee there won’t be an outbreak, but it definitely reduces your risk.  

Wash your hands.  

It’s the No. 1 way to prevent the transmission of germs.  

Cut the clots.  

Using a long flight to get off your feet and catch up on some sleep might seem like a good idea, but depending on your health and the length of your ride, this kind of inactivity can ultimately lead to a serious health problem called Deep Vein Thrombosis. It’s not something you should ignore.  

DVT is inflammation and the development of a blood clot in a deep vein, bringing symptoms of pain, warmth and swelling in the calf, plus pain while flexing the muscle. If you develop these symptoms, seek help immediately, especially if you have shortness of breath.  

To prevent DVT, take walks before and during your flight, stretch during the flight, don’t cross your legs, wear loose fitting clothes and drink lots of water.  

Watch what you eat.  

Order your meals from reputable places.  

A particular well-known ailment is traveler’s diarrhea, or TD, (also known as Montezuma’s Revenge and Tut’s Tummy). Traveler’s diarrhea is defined as three or more stools in 24 hours.  

According to the Mayo Clinic, high-risk destinations for TD include underdeveloped countries in Latin America, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Avoid salads, uncooked vegetables and unpasteurized milk. Only order food that has been cooked and is still hot. Only eat fruit that has been peeled by you. Do not eat undercooked or raw meat, fish or shellfish.  

———  

(TravelPulse is a leading travel authority on the Web, providing consumer travel news and insider tips and advice for an ever-changing travel world. Read more stories at travelpulse.com)


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