You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myStatesman.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myStatesman.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myStatesman.com.

Japan eyes certification for guide interpreters for foreign visitors


TOKYO - The central government intends to create a certification for regionally based guide interpreters that local governments will grant to people who participate in training sessions, in response to the rapid increase in foreign visitors to Japan. 

The government plans to submit a bill to revise the Licensed Guide Interpreters Law to the current Diet session.  

Unlike existing national qualifications, regionally based guide interpreters will be certified by prefectures, cities, towns and villages that grant them on their own, according to the bill. Each local government will compile a plan to develop guide interpreters and conduct training sessions necessary for awarding the qualification.  

Guide interpreters accompany tourists for a fee. But some have said they cannot sufficiently handle the demand from foreign tourists for services in regional areas such as going for a stroll in a town or hiking in the mountains.  

According to the Japan Tourism Agency, there are about 20,000 certified guide interpreters nationwide, but 75 percent of them are based in Tokyo, Osaka Prefecture and other urban areas. The government aims to draw foreign tourists into regional areas with the certification for regionally based guide interpreters.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Travel

Savor the slow life in Rockport
Savor the slow life in Rockport

Some spots in Texas were made for taking it slow. They aren’t glitzy or glamorous or jam-packed with famous attractions or rowdy crowds. But unless that’s the type of vacation you’re after, it’s worth pressing life’s pause button to relax and unwind in Rockport. This once-sleepy fishing village has been a longtime favorite...
Washington man writes books about motorcycle trips to Chile
Washington man writes books about motorcycle trips to Chile

TACOMA, Wash. — He rode the Pan American Highway before it was paved. He spent three days in a Peruvian jail. His motorcycle broke down in Mexico. Canned sardines were a regular meal. Keith Thye of Ruston loved the adventure so much, he decided to recreate it 50 years later. In 1963, Keith Thye dropped out of classes at the University of Oregon...
Drink up, business travelers. The minibar is on the way out.
Drink up, business travelers. The minibar is on the way out.

Do you think of hotel rooms as having spacious, old-school desks, the kind that invite long hours of working? And bureaus with a half-dozen drawers? Minibars, too? Well, perhaps you haven’t stayed at a hotel lately.  Ben Schlappig, a 26-year-old travel blogger and consultant, has spent more nights in hotels than many people will in a lifetime...
You're on plane. A situation is brewing. You have a camera. Do you press record?

Chicago aviation police drag a bloodied man down the aisle of a United plane. A mother clutching her baby weeps after a scuffle with an American Airlines flight attendant. A Transportation Safety Administration officer prods a teenage boy during a security patdown at Dallas/Fort Worth. Fists fly at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood after Spirit cancels dozens...
Talk travel: To check or not to check luggage

The Washington Post's travel writers and editors recently discussed travel stories, questions, gripes and more. Here are edited excerpts:  Q: I'm flying for a short solo trip to Paris, and I'm suddenly panicking about every little thing. The latest: whether or not to check my luggage. I'm taking a carry-on size suitcase and a purse big enough...
More Stories