You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myStatesman.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myStatesman.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myStatesman.com.

Heading to the Hill Country? Don’t miss this new place to stay

Starry’s Studio melds luxury lodging with Fredericksburg charm


When my husband and I started planning a one-night getaway to celebrate our 10-year anniversary in October, Fredericksburg was the natural choice.

A morning hike at Enchanted Rock followed by an afternoon of wine tasting and an evening strolling Main Street and two-stepping at Hondo’s is my idea of a perfect day.

The only problem for two people who are not exactly fans of traditional bed and breakfasts or anonymous hotel chains? Finding a great place to stay.

Cue Starry’s Studio, a new guest house two blocks off of Main Street in Fredericksburg that combines unique, modern design with Hill Country charm.

“We want them to feel comfortable — they’re in Fredericksburg,” said Sarah Starry, who grew up in Fredericksburg and runs Starry’s Studio with her mom, Melissa Starry, and other family members. “We try to surround them with Fredericksburg things, but at the same time (make them think) ‘I can’t believe I’m in Fredericksburg.’”

The family has a long history in the Hill Country town. In 1951, Melissa Starry’s father, Walter Hayden, built what is now Starry’s Studio as a workshop and smokehouse behind the family home, which was built in 1906. Here, he smoked meats from his family’s ranch, tanned leather, made furniture and crafted homemade wines from mustang grapes, agarita berries and local peaches. Melissa Starry took over the property in 1989 with her husband, Ron Starry, living in the main home with daughter Sarah and turning the workshop first into a hair salon (the client roster included Lady Bird Johnson) and later an art studio.

In 2015, the family decided the studio’s next incarnation would be the guest house. It opened for overnight stays in September.

Inside you’ll find a 900-square-foot apartment-style suite decorated with pieces from local artists that range from a twisting deer antler chandelier by Del Benedict of Hill Country Antler Art to a striking mixed-media piece that incorporates the words “All passes — art alone endures” by Melissa Starry. Like a piece? You can buy it.

The studio also features a private outdoor shower, a wide back deck overlooking Barons Creek, high-thread-count linens and a private gated entrance. Sarah Starry said the studio’s design was inspired in part by hotelier Liz Lambert’s properties in Austin.

“It’s easy to get lost in Austin because there’s so many great places, but her places still shine and always will. She took something old and made it fabulous and different from the things that were around it,” Sarah Starry said. “Really we’re just trying to help, if we can, move along this idea that we can mix luxury and travel in Fredericksburg.”

Special touches from area businesses such as Segner’s Pecans, Chocolat and local wineries also contribute to the modern-yet-homespun vibe.

They’re touches that seem to make an impression on guests. The on-site guest book is brimming with glowing reviews, and the property currently enjoys only five-star reviews on Airbnb. After spending an evening there, I can’t help but agree. We couldn’t have had a better visit.

“It’s really cool to just see it and walk in and say, ‘This is exactly what I pictured,’” Sarah Starry said. “The positive feedback is just a cherry on top.”



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Travel

A shiny new ride above the sand at the Jersey Shore
A shiny new ride above the sand at the Jersey Shore

SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. — It was one of the indelible images of the wrath of Hurricane Sandy: a famous Jersey Shore roller coaster reduced to a twisted, mangled wreck in the surf off Seaside Heights, its decades-old iron and steel slicing the coming waves.  It was removed months later, but the gash along the coast remained for years, the emptiness...
A giant ark is just the start
A giant ark is just the start

WILLIAMSTOWN, Ky. - Ken Ham built an ark, a Noah-sized ark, in the verdant, landlocked hills of the American heartland.  At the sight of the wooden vessel, tourists - decidedly more than two-by-two, a caravan of buses surrounding the site - gasp in wonder. Christian school students storm the ramps, many completing science quizzes based on anti-evolutionary...
Bikes and wine make a fine blend in Burgundy
Bikes and wine make a fine blend in Burgundy

Biking and wine tasting may not seem like natural partners. But if you enjoy both, mixing the two can be a highlight of your next French journey. One of the best places to swirl, sip and cycle is Burgundy, which is famous for peaceful lanes that lace together cute towns and venerable vineyards. Start in Beaune, Burgundy’s thriving and popular...
June shines with family fun around the state
June shines with family fun around the state

School is out and June’s long sunshine-filled days pave the perfect path for a summertime road trip. From Georgetown’s free Friday night concerts and Luling’s Watermelon Thump to rodeos and folk festivals, this month’s forecast promises plenty of sun and fun in the Lone Star State. Below are a dozen of the top Texas festivals...
Washington man writes books about motorcycle trips to Chile
Washington man writes books about motorcycle trips to Chile

TACOMA, Wash. — He rode the Pan American Highway before it was paved. He spent three days in a Peruvian jail. His motorcycle broke down in Mexico. Canned sardines were a regular meal. Keith Thye of Ruston loved the adventure so much, he decided to recreate it 50 years later. In 1963, Keith Thye dropped out of classes at the University of Oregon...
More Stories