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Opinion


GOP replacement for Obamacare would leave Americans, Texans stranded

The Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, has flaws. That much is clear. Instead of fixing and improving it so Obamacare continues to be sustainable going forward, Republicans led by House Speaker Paul Ryan are proposing to replace it with a measure that would further break the nation’s health care system. Interestingly, the GOP plan has been attacked from the right and left, albeit for different...
Voices: My ACA experience

Voices: My ACA experience

Devin Williams, a chiropractor and nurse practitioner at the Clinical Educational Center at University Medical Center Brackenridge, screen Juventina Martinez for knee pain in March.
Careful what you wish for with the EPA

Careful what you wish for with the EPA

In case you missed it, the current administration is slashing the Environmental Protection Agency with budget cuts and strong-arm orders for less regulation, with support from many like-minded state leaders. During most of my almost 30 years as an environmental attorney, I have represented regulated entities that are often adverse to the EPA. I am not a fan of all positions taken by EPA. On numerous...
Opinion: Cornyn, Cruz should support bill to keep promise to allies

Opinion: Cornyn, Cruz should support bill to keep promise to allies

It has been nearly a decade since I returned from Iraq as an infantry sergeant in the U.S. Army. Though it took some adjustments at first, I’ve settled comfortably into civilian life. I am blessed in that regard, for while I may have stopped fighting, our country has not. Gen. John Nicholson, the top commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, is now asking for more troops after 15 years there...
What people are saying: Rick Perry and openly gay Texas A&M student president

What people are saying: Rick Perry and openly gay Texas A&M student president

Rick Perry, the former governor of Texas and current U.S. energy secretary, questioned the legitimacy of Texas A&M’s student elections in an opinion piece published Wednesday in the Houston Chronicle. Perry wrote that his alma mater’s disqualification of former student body president candidate Robert McIntosh, who garnered the most votes but was accused of voter intimidation and failure...
Commentary: Why affordable insurance alone won’t keep Americans healthy

Commentary: Why affordable insurance alone won’t keep Americans healthy

As business owners, when our broker recommended four years ago that my husband and I get off the group PPO and switch to marketplace PPO insurance — which saved our company $400 a month due to our age — it seemed like a good idea. At Year One, there was no difference in the quality of insurance. At Year Two, our premiums escalated equal to the cost of our company’s group plan &mdash...
Commentary: This is what happens when health insurance is a privilege

Commentary: This is what happens when health insurance is a privilege

Can you make someone care when they’ve had no personal experience with how devastating something can be? Until you stare a health crisis in the face without insurance, I guess it’s hard to picture that reality. So, what does “people will die without Obamacare” mean? Well, I can tell you. My boyfriend Ryan Noriega died from cancer in 2012. He died after President Barack Obama...
Commentary: Our schools are broken; it’s time to demand change

Commentary: Our schools are broken; it’s time to demand change

Last year, the Texas Supreme Court called our state’s school funding system awful, inadequate and basically a mess – yet still ruled that it met some minimum standard for Texas students. When I asked one legislator to explain this, he said that only three or four people in Texas understood the school finance system — and he wasn’t one of them. Another legislator told me that...
Commentary: Ride-hailing shenanigans at Legislature could produce harm

Commentary: Ride-hailing shenanigans at Legislature could produce harm

A great irony is transpiring at the Texas Legislature. Some conservative legislators are asking their colleagues to throw the principle of local control overboard while also weakening public safety laws. We refer of course to the great ride-hailing legislative scam. Proposed bills would cancel the authority of local governments to regulate Uber and Lyft. In the process, they would lock into place...
Herman: Teaching young people to respect cops in the times we live in

Herman: Teaching young people to respect cops in the times we live in

In Latin and in law it’s known as “in loco parentis.” It’s often a concept of last resort, one not pursued lightly because it runs counter to our better instincts. The literal translation is “in place of a parent.” The best societies are built on the notion that parents — more than governments, more than judges — know what’s best for their children...
Commentary: Rep. King words not offensive; they’re a reminder to us all

Commentary: Rep. King words not offensive; they’re a reminder to us all

Representative Steve King of Iowa recently tweeted, “We can’t restore our civilization with somebody else’s babies.” According to the media, the comment set off a firestorm as critics accused the immigration hardliner of endorsing white nationalism. King says he was equating ‘our civilization’ to culture, not race. But for many of his critics, that is a distinction...
Abbott’s Texas stomps Austin, local governments

Abbott’s Texas stomps Austin, local governments

Governor Greg Abbott speaks before signing his new book ‘Broken but Unbowed’ as he launches his book tour at the Austin-based Texas Public Policy Foundation.
Herman: JetBlue pays off with Zilker Botanical Garden project

Herman: JetBlue pays off with Zilker Botanical Garden project

Remember last year when Austin Mayor Steve Adler encouraged you to stuff the ballot box? And remember when some of you did? And remember when we won? We weren’t exactly sure what we had won, but we won. We found out this week what we won: Our prize package includes mulch. Lots of dark, mulch-smelling mulch. And much more than mulch. Let me explain. JetBlue is an airline. It runs an annual Green...
Commentary: Instead of poisoning feral hogs, Texans should eat them

Commentary: Instead of poisoning feral hogs, Texans should eat them

Last month, our state’s agricultural commissioner declared that the Hog Apocalypse in Texas will soon begin. Sid Miller, the man best known for gunning for (and gunning down) our feral hog population, has never hidden his dislike of the invasive swine species. But he’s taken things to a dangerous new level. His approval to begin using warfarin, an anticoagulant that, when consumed in high...
Commentary: Enterprise Fund gives Texans’ money to their competitors

Commentary: Enterprise Fund gives Texans’ money to their competitors

In 2013 and 2014, then-gubernatorial candidate Greg Abbott expressed skepticism about corporate welfare. His predecessor, Gov. Rick Perry, had no such qualms. Perry had established the Texas Enterprise Fund in 2003 to help attract out-of-state businesses by dispensing “economic development” incentives. It grew to become the largest closing fund of its kind in the country. But candidate...
Commentary: Texas workers shouldn’t need a license for everything

Commentary: Texas workers shouldn’t need a license for everything

Should you need a license to work? For a few key fields such as, say, brain surgery, most people would say “yes.” Yet in recent decades, the number of occupations requiring a license has expanded dramatically. Since the 1950s, the percentage of Americans working in a field requiring an occupational licensing has grown from 5 percent to more than 20 percent. In Texas, nearly one-third of...
Commentary: Legislators must fix failed promise of step therapy

Commentary: Legislators must fix failed promise of step therapy

Unfortunately, “step therapy” is a common practice in the insurance world. It requires patients to try out a cheaper, alternative prescription drug than the medication their physician originally prescribed. The hope is that the cheaper option will prove to be equivalent and effective. All too often, it’s not. Only when – after considerable lost time – the proposed alternative...
Commentary: Two state proposed bills would limit freedom of expression

Commentary: Two state proposed bills would limit freedom of expression

It has been seven years since the United States Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Committee. By holding that unlimited corporate spending to “influence” political outcomes is a form of protected speech, the Court significantly altered the American marketplace of ideas. Political representation — like commodities — is now open for bidding...
Staples: Remember all that’s possible because of oil and natural gas

Staples: Remember all that’s possible because of oil and natural gas

With 100-plus years of oil and natural gas history in Texas, it may be tempting to take for granted all that is possible because we are the nation’s No. 1 state for oil and natural gas production, pipeline miles and refining capacity. Today, Texans from far and wide will remind lawmakers in Austin that those accolades translate into jobs, state and local tax revenue and financial security for...
Herman: Texas Legislature halfway through all the damage it can do?

Herman: Texas Legislature halfway through all the damage it can do?

We’re just about halfway through the 140-day legislative session. Through mid-morning Tuesday, 8,274 pieces of legislation had been filed and 1,241 had been approved. Sounds pretty productive until you realize that 1,226 of the approved measures were resolutions honoring stuff like really nice dead people, a hometown church or winners of the Robstown school district’s coveted “Proud...
Opinion: Texas’ digital super users crave more interactive government

Opinion: Texas’ digital super users crave more interactive government

We have all witnessed the power of digital technologies to transform the relationship between commercial industries and their customers. Digital experiences have improved dramatically, becoming much broader, faster and more efficient. Today, consumers have access to personalized content and product recommendations, one-click ordering and customer service that moves seamlessly from in-store to smartphone...
John Young: Blind fury: F-rating for wreckage from Trumpcare

John Young: Blind fury: F-rating for wreckage from Trumpcare

The Fujita scale is the “F” by which weather people rate tornadoes. F-1: A carport down. F-5: Whole city blocks reduced to grout. We now lean on such comparisons in assessing the shades of disaster that would emanate from Trumpcare, especially compared with what Donald Trump claimed would happen. Trump the campaigner said his plan would provide “insurance for everyone.” The...
Opinion: To defend rule of law, Dems must filibuster Gorsuch hearing

Opinion: To defend rule of law, Dems must filibuster Gorsuch hearing

Hearings on President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee begin this week. By all accounts, his choice, Neil Gorsuch, is highly qualified for the position. Those on both the right and left speak to his intelligence, his considerate approach to legal analysis, and the care with which he approaches each case. Under normal circumstances, he might sail to an easy confirmation. Unfortunately, the Supreme...
David Brooks: The unifying American story

David Brooks: The unifying American story

One of the things we’ve lost in this country is our story. It is the narrative that unites us around a common multigenerational project, that gives an overarching sense of meaning and purpose to our history. For most of the past 400 years, Americans did have an overarching story. It was the Exodus story. The Puritans came to this continent and felt they were escaping the bondage of their Egypt...
Commentary: Volunteers needed to help end Alzheimer’s

Commentary: Volunteers needed to help end Alzheimer’s

Today, hundreds of thousands of people in Texas deal with the harsh realities of Alzheimer’s disease everyday — either because they are diagnosed with it or because they experience the impact of the disease firsthand as they care for a loved one with Alzheimer’s. Without any new medical breakthroughs, experts believe the number of case of Alzheimer’s will triple by 2050. Worldwide...
Commentary: I voted for the first time in 2016 and why I’ll vote again

Commentary: I voted for the first time in 2016 and why I’ll vote again

Last November, I voted for the first time. I’m 23, and while I was old enough to vote in 2012, I didn’t vote because I didn’t feel I had much at stake. In November, however, I voted because the election felt personal. Some of the people I love most — my girlfriend and my father — are undocumented and I feared that I would be separated from them. Not only did I vote in...
Commentary: Legislative investment key for foster children success

Commentary: Legislative investment key for foster children success

Graduating from college, or just attending college, seem like impossible dreams for foster children after they “graduate” out of the system at age 18. A number of Texas House and Senate bills this session address college access for this population. Senate Bill 482, authored by Sen. Borris Miles (D), for instance, proposes that the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services work...
Commentary: U.S. should welcome Muslims as Pakistanis welcomed me

Commentary: U.S. should welcome Muslims as Pakistanis welcomed me

I joined the U.S. Peace Corps in 1963 out of a desire to serve my country in a constructive way, but also a desire to live and work in a culture radically different from my own. When the call came from the Peace Corps, the official said, “On your application you wrote that India was your country of choice. We are going to train a group for Pakistan. Since Pakistan was once a part of India, are...

Letters to the editor: March 21, 2017

Re: March 5 article, “Austin ICE raids: Meet the immigrants arrested.” I am an immigrant, legal, documented! I came here when I was 22 years old and I am a U.S. citizen now. I personally know several illegal undocumented aliens and I guarantee you that each and every one knows very well that they are here in violation of the laws. I am sick and tired of your sob stories about undocumented...
Separating children and moms won’t deter illegal immigration

Separating children and moms won’t deter illegal immigration

Recent news reports indicate that the Department of Homeland Security is considering causing children psychological harm as a strategy to curb illegal immigration from Central America. It is contemplating separating mothers and children who cross the border without authorization. Regardless whether this practice becomes official policy, it is already happening in Texas, and it is not deterring women...
Commentary: Texas can raise the age and keep youth, communities safe

Commentary: Texas can raise the age and keep youth, communities safe

Few Texans would want to be judged their entire life based on what they did or who they were when they were 17 — an age when most of us were in high school. However, Texas is one of only seven states where all 17- year-old offenders are placed in the adult justice system. “Raising the age” of juvenile court jurisdiction so that 17-year-olds will presumptively go into the juvenile...
Two Views: Which bills will survive distance between Senate, House?

Two Views: Which bills will survive distance between Senate, House?

In 1990, a Democratic member of the U.S. House named Al Swift was quoted in D.C.-area media reports as saying “Republicans are the opposition, but the Senate is the enemy.” That line remains a shrewd observation today. Though partisanship is a considerable factor in any legislative body, nothing unites a legislative body like the disdain it has for its counterpart. There are about 70 days...
Two Views: Distance between House, Senate leaves key bills in doubt

Two Views: Distance between House, Senate leaves key bills in doubt

It was an old ritual of the high school rebels: light up our cigarettes in the bathroom. That’ll show the teachers and the principals who’s really in charge! In our ritual conformity, we rebels were a rather sad spectacle, but we can put the behavior off to adolescent confusions. The same excuse can’t be made for Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, who has turned the 2017 Legislature into an extended...
No matter what they’re called, vouchers won’t improve public schools

No matter what they’re called, vouchers won’t improve public schools

As the saying goes, a rose by any other name still smells as sweet. Similarly, vouchers by any other name still stink. You would think that Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and other lawmakers in love with vouchers would know as much by now, after more than a decade of pushing to get them passed into law. Instead, they continue romanticizing them as the answer for improving public schools, especially low-performing...
Commentary: In balancing the budget, is a cuts-only approach right?

Commentary: In balancing the budget, is a cuts-only approach right?

Of all the decisions that the Texas Legislature will make this year, none may be more important than this: How do we manage the state’s resources in a way that is prudent, responsible and supportive of economic growth? Over the last two years, state sales tax collections have come in weaker than expected. Meanwhile, Texas has continued to grow as fast as almost any other state; key facilities...
Herman: Judge ponders whether Hooters is school trip appropriate

Herman: Judge ponders whether Hooters is school trip appropriate

Once again (and this makes twice, as far as I know), Your State Government is wrestling with a particular existential issue of our day. This is no less than a real-time review of something sociologists, psychologists, archaeologists and all kinds of ologists someday will somehow make a living studying. It is this: What’s the deal with Hooters? TAKE A BREAK AT MIDDAY: Click here for our midday...
Castillo: Why the border wall fences us in

Castillo: Why the border wall fences us in

From atop a dusty bluff on the U.S. Mexico border in deep South Texas, the mighty Rio Grande commands the panoramic vista below. Its waters a muted hue of green, the river courses wildly in every direction, zig-zagging here, straightening out there for about a mile due south before making an impossible hairpin turn due north, then zig-zagging again. With its bedeviling twists and turns, the Rio Grande...
Commentary: Shuttering supported living centers hurts our vulnerable

Commentary: Shuttering supported living centers hurts our vulnerable

Senate Bill 602 would establish a commission to evaluate the future of each of the 13 state supported living center (SSLC) currently serving persons with severe intellectual developmental disabilities. Authored by Sen. Juan “Chuy” Hinojosa (D-McAllen), the bill would authorize five gubernatorial appointees to identify centers that should be shuttered or consolidated with other centers...
Commentary: Higher education must respond to changing workforce

Commentary: Higher education must respond to changing workforce

Texas’ dynamic economy is something we should embrace — a changing and growing economy based on the diversity of both jobs and our workforce. From health care to education, the oil patch to technology and cybersecurity, the jobs are there, but how will we fill them? How Texas addresses that dynamism and the accompanying challenges it poses is key to our long-term prosperity. And, higher...
Why the border wall fences us in

Why the border wall fences us in

A section of the border fence with a gate, bounded by smaller chain-link fence in Runn, Texas. The patchwork border fence along the Texas-Mexico border has created a nebulous and bizarre third space between countries.
Commentary: Unlikely allies talk criminal justice reform at SXSW

Commentary: Unlikely allies talk criminal justice reform at SXSW

Unlikely allies. That’s how I describe the partnership formed between me — a former convict — hip-hop icon Snoop Dogg and Mark Holden of Koch Industries. Yes, that Koch Industries. Yet an alliance is what we’ve become since last year. And on Saturday at South by Southwest, we’ll come together to discuss the issue that’s bound us all together: criminal justice reform...
Commentary: Adopted indivuals should have access to birth certificates

Commentary: Adopted indivuals should have access to birth certificates

A bill that would restore access for adults who were born and adopted in Texas to a non-certified copy of their original birth certificate is currently making it’s way through the Texas legislature. Senate Bill 329 and House Bill 547 are the bills to support for this proposed restoration of rights. Most people assume adoptees get their information when they become adults, but in Texas this is...
Central Texas says goodbye to four whose lives touched so many

Central Texas says goodbye to four whose lives touched so many

We join Central Texans in mourning the loss of four beloved people whose lives were deeply rooted in their families and communities. Saying goodbye, especially to those lost unexpectedly, is tough. This week, funeral services were held for Kenneth Hoffman, 82, and his wife, Peggy Hoffman, 73, both of Lockhart, who were among four people killed last week when their charter bus was struck by a freight...
Letters to the editor: March 27, 2017

Letters to the editor: March 27, 2017

Re: March 13 commentary, “Legalizing drug importation harms Texas’ patients, economy.” The viewpoint expressed by Thomas R. Kowalski citing imports harming local economy is exactly correct. In fact, the exact situation has already occurred — not in the drug manufacturing industry but in the American automobile manufacturing industry. In the 1990s and 2000s, every point Kowalski...

We’re against emotionalism, except when we’re not

Conservatives have rightly taken pride in Neil Gorsuch’s calm and cerebral performance at his Senate confirmation hearings. Many commentators, along with Republican senators, have mocked Democrats for presuming to evaluate Gorsuch based on the outcomes of his cases. Did he “side with the little guy” or with big corporations? The right answer, conservatives have correctly chided,...
Have time to read? Check out the best-sellers

Have time to read? Check out the best-sellers

NEW YORK TIMES BEST-SELLERS FICTION 1. ‘Dangerous Games,’ Danielle Steel 2. ‘Silence Fallen,’ Patricia Briggs 3. ‘Norse Mythology,’ Neil Gaiman 4. ‘Lincoln in the Bardo,’ George Saunders 5. ‘Exit West,’ Moshin Hamid 6. ‘A Gentleman in Moscow,’ Amor Towles 7. ‘Hearbreak Hotel,’ Jonathan Kellerman 8. ‘The Whistler...
Katey Sagal, John Oates write memoirs, on way to Austin for signings

Katey Sagal, John Oates write memoirs, on way to Austin for signings

Golden Globe–winning actress Katey Sagal tells the story of her life as a singer/songwriter who unexpectedly became a TV star in “Grace Notes: My Recollections.” Sagal grew up with two parents who had artistic aspirations. Her mother had been a TV screenwriter, and her quick-tempered, workaholic father had dropped out of Harvard Law School to become a respected TV director. But their...

Letters to the editor: March 26, 2017

The nature and language of our health care debate is incorrectly focused on access to insurance instead of access to health care. We must decide whether or not the health care of our citizens is a right or a privilege. As long as corporate and lobbying money controls the debate and the voting direction, the requirement that for-profit insurance companies will be the gatekeepers to healthcare will...

Trump’s chickens finally come home to roost

On Monday, accountability finally arrived for Donald Trump. After 70 years spent largely skating free of consequences for his puerile misbehaviors and diarrheal mouth, he likely found it something of a shock. Seven decades is a long time, after all, and if the so-called president has learned nothing else in those years, he has learned this: Accountability is for other people. Received a bill? Stiff...
Facebook comments: March 26, 2017

Facebook comments: March 26, 2017

As reported by the American-Statesman’s Bob Sechler, lawmakers sparred over the minimum wage in Texas at a House committee hearing on Monday. Several bills were discussed, including House Bill 937, which would increase the state’s minimum wage to $10.10 an hour in stages, and HB 992 which would raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Opponents said job growth could shrink if the state&rsquo...
Visit a new sci-fi universe in ‘The Collapsing Empire’

Visit a new sci-fi universe in ‘The Collapsing Empire’

Recommended reading “The Collapsing Empire” by John Scalzi (Tor). One of the most popular science fiction authors to emerge in the last decade, Scalzi now returns with the beginning of another saga. The author of “Redshirts” and the “Old Man’s War” series is presenting the first novel, “The Collapsing Empire,” of a new space-opera sequence set...

An oasis of liberty in the Arizona sun

PHOENIX — As a boy, Barry Goldwater Jr., son of the former senator and 1964 Republican presidential nominee, would step out of his father’s house and shoot at tin cans 50 yards away. Now 78, he says he could fire in any direction and not endanger “anything but a cactus.” His father, born in 1909 in Arizona territory, three years before statehood, built the house on a bluff...
Letters to the editor: March 25, 2017

Letters to the editor: March 25, 2017

Re: March 2 commentary, “Two Views: Schools could thrive with free market, less bureaucracy.” In reference to Brendan Steinhauser’s claim that dollars following each child “improves outcomes for all students, whether in public schools or private schools”: I disagree. If tax dollars go to parents already sending their children to private schools, this is a bonus for them...
Gail Collins: Trump stays buggy

Gail Collins: Trump stays buggy

Whatever Donald Trump has, it’s spreading. We’ve got a president who makes things up — and won’t retract when he’s cornered. This week press secretary Sean Spicer followed the leader. He picked up Trump’s wiretap story and added a new exciting detail: Not only had Barack Obama bugged Trump Tower, he might have used British intelligence spies to do the dirty work...
Krauthammer: American democracy is not so decadent after all

Krauthammer: American democracy is not so decadent after all

Under the dark gray cloud, amid the general gloom, allow me to offer a ray of sunshine. The last two months have brought a pleasant surprise: Turns out the much feared, much predicted withering of our democratic institutions has been grossly exaggerated. The system lives. Let me explain. Donald Trump’s triumph last year was based on a frontal attack on the Washington “establishment,&rdquo...
Viewpoints: GOP health care plan goes up in smoke; now fix Obamacare

Viewpoints: GOP health care plan goes up in smoke; now fix Obamacare

The Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, has flaws. That much is clear. But its replacement, the American Health Care Act, would have further broken the nation’s health care system. Instead of fixing and improving Obamacare so it continues to be sustainable going forward, Republicans led by House Speaker Paul Ryan wasted time and clout with a proposal that put politics ahead of people. No wonder...
Letters to the editor: March 24, 2017

Letters to the editor: March 24, 2017

Re: March 11 letter to the editor, “Free press critical to U.S.; Trump must be rebuked.” Those defending the media recently have gotten two things right: The free press is the watchdog of the government, and its protections and duty are explicitly granted in the U.S. Constitution. But when the press becomes derelict in this duty, who is holding them accountable? As the press seems to have...

COMMENTARY: Gorsuch’s convenient untruth about partisan judges

With a shrewdly calculated innocence, Judge Neil Gorsuch told a big fat lie at his confirmation hearing on Tuesday. Because it was a lie everyone expected, nobody called it that. “There’s no such thing as a Republican judge or a Democratic judge,” Gorsuch said. Gorsuch, the amiable veteran of many Republican campaigns, is well-placed to know how serious a fib that was. As Sen. Al...

Will Russiagate backfire on the left?

The big losers of the Russian hacking scandal may yet be those who invested all their capital in a script that turned out to based on a fairy tale. In Monday’s Intelligence Committee hearings, James Comey did confirm that his FBI has found nothing to support President Trump’s tweet that President Obama ordered him wiretapped. Not unexpected, but undeniably an embarrassment for the tweeter-in-chief...

And Jesus said unto Paul of Ryan …

A woman who had been bleeding for 12 years came up behind Jesus and touched his clothes in hope of a cure. Jesus turned to her and said: “Fear not. Because of your faith, you are now healed.” Then spoke Pious Paul of Ryan: “But teacher, is that wise? When you cure her, she learns dependency. Then the poor won’t take care of themselves, knowing that you’ll always bail...
Letters to the editor: March 23, 2017

Letters to the editor: March 23, 2017

Re: March 8 commentary, “Pause Trump’s presidency pending probe on Russia ties.” Before I begin, let me be clear that I am not a Donald Trump supporter. But that does not stop me from being appalled by the absurdity of Charles Blow’s piece. The basis for his editorial is that Trump is not the president because the election was rigged. He refuses to even call Trump president...

OPINION: Gorsuch offers chance to be nation of laws, not Left politics

My first experience with Senate confirmation hearings for a Supreme Court justice nominee was in 1991 at the hearings for Clarence Thomas. I came to Washington to support Justice Thomas. The hearings were a national embarrassment. The main focus turned out to be about neither the Constitution nor about Thomas’ jurisprudence. It was about Democratic senators descending to the gutter and dredging...
Letters to the editor: March 22, 2017

Letters to the editor: March 22, 2017

Re: March 4 article, “Jonathan Sessler, UT’s inventor of year, challenges odds in life, work.” Professor Jonathan Sessler’s recognition as UT’s 2016 inventor of the year is well-deserved. Journalist Marty Toohey should also be recognized for keeping the focus of the article on the value of scientific inquiry. Sessler has a compelling personal story and it would have been...
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