You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myStatesman.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myStatesman.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myStatesman.com.

Voids discovered in Great Pyramid; scientists now try to figure out what they are


The Great Pyramid has been a puzzle for scientists for centuries, but new discoveries are leading to new questions about one of the wonders of the classical world.

Scientists, using state-of-the-art technology, have found voids in the massive structure, which was built in 2560 BC, The Telegraph reported.

A group of experts from universities, companies and institutes worldwide comprise "Scan Pyramids" and are using muography, thermography and 3-D simulation to map the pyramid.

Muons are able to penetrate thick rocks like X-rays penetrate the body, Discovery's Seeker website reported earlier this year.

>> Read more trending stories  

The group also scanned the Bent Pyramid, named for the slope of the upper section of the structure, as the first in its year-long project.

Thermography uses infrared to map structures. The different techniques are then combined to render a 3-D reconstruction to study the ancient buildings.

The team has found chevron patterns made of stone that it said were not used as decoration, but possibly to seal voids in structure.

Chevrons were used to cover the king and queen chambers, to either protect a room or keep a roof from collapsing, Scan Pyramid reported

Now researchers are trying to determine why so many chevrons were put in to protect a small area on a descending corridor

Scientists said they performed multiple tests to make sure it was not noise or "statistical fluctuation" and the results suggest that there is a void, or voids, behind the stonework.

The teams confirmed the void on the north face of the pyramid. Now they are trying to find the precise size and shape. 

They are also examining the queen's Cchamber. The results are expected to be released early 2017, The Telegraph reported.

To read more on the discovery and the technology used, click here.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Nation & World

President-elect Donald Trump honors the late John Glenn
President-elect Donald Trump honors the late John Glenn
President-elect Donald Trump honored the first American to orbit the Earth on Thursday, a little more than an hour after Glenn’s death was announced.
Amazon.com scam hits shoppers before holidays
Amazon.com scam hits shoppers before holidays
Holiday shoppers who use Amazon.com to buy presents for loved ones will want to pay attention to the latest scam that’s targeting consumers’ personal information.
Donald Trump voters explain why they chose their candidate
Donald Trump voters explain why they chose their candidate
A group of 10 Florida voters answered a call by the Palm Beach Post to discuss why they chose to vote for Donald Trump during the 2016 election.
John Glenn: A storybook life, an American hero
John Glenn: A storybook life, an American hero
“The Right Stuff” author Tom Wolfe once said of John H. Glenn Jr. that he is “the last true national hero America has ever had.
John Glenn: Former U.S. senator, astronaut dies at 95
John Glenn: Former U.S. senator, astronaut dies at 95
Former astronaut and U.S. Sen. John Glenn died on Thursday in Ohio. He was 95 years old. Read more trending stories Glenn was surrounded by family at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus when he died, The Columbus Dispatch reported.
More Stories