The Old Pecan Street Festival needs your memories and photos

Nonprofit street fiesta is trying to build a library of words and images.


The 40th anniversary of the of the Old Pecan Street Festival is right around the corner. This large street fiesta that includes music, food, drink, arts and crafts — as well as unparalleled people-watching — returns to East Sixth Street May 6-7.

In order to celebrate this community event properly, the Pecan Street Association desires your memories. They imagine your images. They ache for your anecdotes.

“We are appealing to the public at large,” says festival director Debbie Russell. “As well as to past festival vendors, musicians, street performers, crew workers, charitable recipients … to help us build a library of Pecan Street Festivals past.”

Not that long ago, an exiting former leader claimed and kept the nonprofit festival’s existing archives. That leaves the current administration at the without extensive institutional memory.

So they are looking for photos, posters, testimonials — or perhaps a video of yourself telling a favorite Old Pecan Street Festival story.

Email your collectibles to debbie@pecanstreetfestival.org. Then look for updates on social media by using #PecanStreetFest40.

On March 27 — exactly 40 days out from the fest — Russell started sharing the submitted words and images digitally. She’ll also make them available at the Pecan Street Association’s booth during the actual festival.

We love this kind of community history-making and, after all, we use reader appeals all the time. They call it crowd-sourcing these days.

So we look forward to what they gather. Who knows? It might turn into an even bigger project.

You can’t understand New Austin without delving into Old Austin. One digital avenue for that quest is Austin Found, a series of historical images of Austin and Texas published at statesman.com/austinfound. We’ll share samples here regularly.



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