Report: Proposed Mexican-American textbook rife with errors


A proposed Mexican-American studies textbook is riddled with errors, many of them racially charged, according to a report released Tuesday from a committee of educators who studied the book.

The report, citing 141 errors, follows outcry from Hispanic activists and academics who called the proposed book for Texas high school students offensive and inaccurate.

Cynthia Dunbar, chief executive officer of the book’s publisher, Momentum Instruction, however, told the American-Statesman that there is no hidden agenda or attempt to malign Hispanics.

“There was no goal here to do anything other than put forward a good objective textbook,” said Dunbar, a former Republican member of the State Board of Education.

State Board of Education member Ruben Cortez Jr., D-Brownsville, asked seven professors and a high school teacher to review the proposed textbook “Mexican American Heritage,” which the Texas Education Agency released in May for the public to review.

READ: Does a new Texas textbook whitewash Mexican-American history?

Referencing the committee’s findings, Cortez on Tuesday slammed Dunbar and the book in particular as a “complete disaster” and “a political Trojan horse into our schools,” speaking at an elementary school in Brownsville and shown on Facebook Live.

“This racially offensive textbook is a glimpse into her distorted reality of what the Hispanic culture represents to her. Her actions are morally reprehensible, and we cannot allow it to enter into our Texas public schools,” Cortez said. Cortez also criticized Dunbar for once calling public schools a “subtly deceptive tool of perversion.”

The State Board of Education will hold a public hearing about proposed textbooks, including “Mexican American Heritage,” next Tuesday during its regular meeting.

Critics have blasted the textbook for painting the Chicano movement as a “threat to society,” omitting the contributions of Mexican-American female civil rights leaders, and for suggesting immigration “has been increasingly tied up with an illegal drug trade” and suggesting that Hispanics are lazy.

Dismissing Cortez’s accusations, Dunbar said she has tried to contact the educators examining the book so that any errors could be corrected. She was turned away, she said.

“It would seem like the logical thing would be to call and talk to people calmly and work together instead of doing this horrible hit piece, character assassination,” Dunbar said.

Since it was first proposed to the state in April, the book has undergone several edits based on public comments to the Texas Education Agency, Dunbar said.

She said the education agency has only let her know of one error in the book and it was corrected – a passage that implied that English was the official language of the U.S.

The education agency has given the book preliminary approval because it aligns with the state’s curriculum standards.

Dunbar also defended the book’s authors, Jaime Riddle and Valarie Angle, who she said have backgrounds in education and curriculum development and relied on primary sources to present different sides so that students and teachers can arrive at their own conclusions.

The board will decide whether to adopt the textbook in November.

Cortez wants the board to reject the proposed text and reopen bids for a new one. In that case, it would probably be couple of years before another Mexican-American studies textbook is adopted.

School districts aren’t required to use textbooks approved by the board, but many end up adopting them instead of finding other material.

Cortez on Tuesday asked fellow state Board of Education member David Bradley, R-Beaumont, to apologize for telling the Statesman in June that complaints about the book were only coming from “left-leaning, radical Hispanic activists.”

Bradley on Tuesday accused Cortez of contriving controversy for his own benefit and of writing the book off before the Texas Education Agency has released its final recommendations.

“The freshman member once again has got the cart before the horse. He is unwilling and unable to understand the rules for the board’s adoption process,” Bradley said.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Texas News & Politics

Smoking pot while owning guns kept Austin man in jail for eight months
Smoking pot while owning guns kept Austin man in jail for eight months

When prosecutors could not prove allegations that an Austin man planned to use his stockpile of guns for an attack on the city’s police in April, they pivoted to an obscure federal charge that kept the defendant behind bars because of two habits he has. Steven Boehle shoots guns. He also smokes pot. The combination of the two is prohibited, according...
PolitiFact: Promise to change immigrant tuition law goes broken
PolitiFact: Promise to change immigrant tuition law goes broken

Greg Abbott ran for Texas governor signaling he’d go along with disconnecting a political tripwire for Republicans that benefits college students from Texas living in the United States without legal permission. We decided to put Abbott’s statements about in-state tuition for such Texans to the PolitiFact Texas Abbott-O-Meter, which tracks...
Community news: Dougherty Arts Center closing for maintenance

TRAVIS COUNTY SOUTH AUSTIN Dougherty closing for maintenance The Dougherty Arts Center, at 1110 Barton Springs Road, will close for required routine maintenance from Monday to Friday. During this time, the business office will be closed, as well as the front of the building including the gallery, rehearsal rooms, artist resource center and theater...
Traffic report for Dec. 18, 2017

Interstate 35 (Travis County): The inside lane on the northbound access road will be closed between the Oltorf Street exit and Royal Hill Drive from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. Monday through Thursday nights; the Oltorf Street exit (#232) will also be closed. The outside lane on the southbound access road will be closed between Reinli Street and 53½ Street...
Past Season for Caring-nominated family donates to this year’s family
Past Season for Caring-nominated family donates to this year’s family

In 2014, Wendi and Todd Noble and their daughter Avery were one of three families nominated to the Statesman Season for Caring program by nonprofit organization Wonders & Worries. At the time Todd Noble had been diagnosed with stage four non-Hodgkins lymphoma and life was emotionally and financially uncertain. The committee at the American-Statesman...
More Stories