Mayo Clinic study: High-intensity interval training can reverse aging process


A new study by the Mayo Clinic found that certain workouts can reverse the aging process.

The study found that a high-intensity interval training workout, combined with resistance training, can turn back time.

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"You're essentially slowing down that aging process, (which) I think is amazing, because we didn't have those things before," said Dr. Vandana Bhide, of the Mayo Clinic.

The study was conducted by researchers in Rochester, Minnesota, and targeted two age groups -- 18 to 30-year-olds and 65 to 85-year-olds.

As we age, we lose muscle mass. Researchers found that a combined workout increases muscle mass, and on the cellular level, reverses some of the adverse effects of aging.

"For older people, it allows them to be more functional, to be able to do as much as they can at whatever age,” Bhide said.

Researchers tracked data over 12 weeks.

"It's not overnight, but we think of it taking years," Bhide said.

Florida-based fitness franchise Orange Theory Fitness focuses on these types of workouts.

"It kind of just reaffirms what we already believe here," head coach Justin Hoffman said. "We've seen tremendous strength gain, even (at) 70 years plus, with just 3 to 4 days of interval training.”

Bhide said older people who are interested in these workouts should check with their doctor before starting. And as with any exercise program, everybody is different and may not get the same results.


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