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Williams: The greatest Christmas gift for our country


The responsibility to serve Texans in the 25th Congressional District is the highest honor that has ever been bestowed to me, and I am incredibly grateful to have been elected to a third two-year term in the U.S. House of Representatives as your congressman.

With a new Congress and new administration around the corner, we have our work cut out for us. I am incredibly optimistic of what we will achieve. We must first, off the bat, repair a torn relationship between Congress and the White House.

To President-elect Trump, I ask that he swiftly undo the executive orders of his predecessor who ruled with a pen and rarely considered input from legislators in the House and Senate. I ask that he help restore the proper functions of our government in which the legislative branch writes the laws and the executive enforces them. This is the best way to hold individuals in Washington accountable to the American people and ensure laws will stand the test of time. The disastrous policies of the last eight years underscore why we need to encourage more small business people to run for office.

To some people’s amazement, under the Obama Administration, there are unelected government workers writing rules and regulations who are appointed, not elected, and therefore unaccountable to the people they impact significantly. If we had more private sector experience in government maybe we wouldn’t have the job killing regulations that were included in the 2,000 page Dodd-Frank law. Maybe we wouldn’t have a failed health care system full of broken promises. And maybe, just maybe, we wouldn’t have an immigration system that’s run amok.

When I recently honored retiring Texas Congressman Randy Neugebauer on the House floor, I praised him for his “valuable firsthand knowledge” of how the private sector works. “He understands how Washington’s decisions affect Main Street,” I said, referring to his prior life as a community banker. This trait is oftentimes lacking in a town where government is a dominant employer. Combine that with the Washington, DC area’s above average wealth, and you get a city that is shielded from the normal everyday hardships faced by the rest of the country. It’s no wonder that D.C. is hated for being so out of touch.

Fortunately, it appears that Trump is off on the right start. He has chosen to surround himself with advisers who have created jobs, defended our freedom and are highly respected on both sides of the Capitol. In January, I intend to roll up my sleeves and work with my colleagues and the Trump Administration to undo the harmful policies that were forced on the American people by executive order or passed without proper debate. We will implement an agenda that will create opportunity for all.

I have already introduced legislation to reform our tax code and rein in the power of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau – pro-growth measures that I know will return our economy to four percent growth, encourage entrepreneurs to take risks and be rewarded and lift costly regulatory burdens off of Main Street so it can begin hiring once again.

Despite my public frustrations over the past four years, I am very much looking to the near future when I can happily turn the page as we begin a new Congress with a new Administration. In my opinion, this is the greatest Christmas gift for our country.

Note: Updated at 11:20 am, Dec. 22.

Williams is a Republican from Austin and represents Texas’ 25th congressional district in the U.S. House of Representatives.



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