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Facebook comments: Jan. 15, 2017


The American-Statesman’s Marty Toohey recently tackled the question on many people’s minds this time of year: Why can’t we just wipe out allergy-causing cedar trees? Experts from the Texas A&M Forest Service and the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Johnson Center explained there were several reasons for not eradicating the trees. Among them: Mountain cedar is so well adapted to Central Texas that about 10 million acres are home to it across the Edwards Plateau, and it does have some ecological benefits, such as helping to minimize erosion.

Bobby Adame: This is about the same as people moving to Austin and buying a house next to a barbecue restaurant that has been in business for over 40 years, then suing because of the smoke bothering them.

Juan Reyes: I’m a native Central Texan and this stuff always gets to me.

Rebecca Santiago: I think there should be a cedar removal and replacement holiday.

Jason Rayls: If it’s that bad, wouldn’t it be easier to move than cut down all the trees?

Ronald Tipton: They make great fence posts and are really pretty in cabin construction.

Brian Smith: The smell of dead cedar is wonderful. It’s the only good cedar.

Estaven Shepard: The state should have never let this tree come in and get out of control. Not controlling it is irresponsible and a public health issue.

Cindy Powers: You will survive, just take meds. It will pass soon.

Willie Nweke: Wow — we’re anti-tree now? Humans hate everything.

Brian Smith: Just one tree. We don’t need them. We can replace them.

Patrick Davis: Cedar. I am so glad millions of hamsters take a dump on that stuff everyday.



Reader Comments ...


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