Letters to the editor: Oct. 13 2017


An open letter to Jeff Bezos:

Please protect LGBTQ Amazon employees from the Texas Legislature, Texas Supreme Court, Lt. Gov. Patrick and Gov. Abbott by not bringing Amazon HQ2 to Texas.

The Texas Supreme Court held that the U.S. Supreme Court ruling making same-sex marriage legal doesn’t include publicly funded benefits to LGBTQ spouses.

The Texas Legislature passed a law that allows faith-based adoption agencies to reject same-sex couples. Then there was the infamous “bathroom bill” that would have discriminated against transgender people anda bill that would have allowed individuals in licensed occupations to deny services based on religious beliefs. That means a pharmacist could have refused AIDS patients.

That’s the kind of provincialism to which a Texas Amazon HQ2 would be subjected. When you thumb your nose at the Lone Star State, please make it known that it’s because of all the bigots in Texas government.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

JESUS BARRERA, AUSTIN

Re: Oct. 7 commentary, “How did Heidi Group use millions? Texas women need answers.”

I agree with what Katie O’Connor wrote about the Heidi Group with one exception: “Given that (Carol) Everett was known as an anti-abortion crusader rather than a health care provider, it’s hard to fathom why the Texas Health and Human Services Commission entrusted the Heidi Group with state money in the first place.”

Not hard to understand at all: Politics triumphs over reason. That is happening all too often in our health care system these days, as well as in many other aspects of modern life.

JOYCE LYNCH, AUSTIN

Re: Oct. 4 article, “Red Cross’ Harvey response lambasted.”

As a longtime volunteer with the American Red Cross I was saddened to see the article lambasting the work of the Red Cross in response to Hurricane Harvey.

To such critics, it is important to point out that the Red Cross has a congressional mandate to respond to natural disasters but does not receive any governmental funding. It is totally dependent on contributions. Also, as for personnel, the Red Cross depends on volunteers who are already in the disaster area, because volunteers cannot be sent into unsafe situations. Therefore, a good way to improve immediate, local response to natural disasters is for local people to take training in Red Cross Disaster Response courses and be prepared to use these skills when disaster strikes.

BETTY HENDRIX, AUSTIN

Re: Oct. 6 article, “Austin City Council replaces Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day.”

It’s comforting to know that Mayor Steve Adler and Council Member Greg Casar have solved all of Austin’s problems and as a result of their free time were able to cure the long running problems associated with Austin having a Columbus Day.

We now have an Indigenous Peoples Day, happy days are here again. Actually, Alder’s and Casar’s actions in office have led to an increase number of “free range” people in Austin. Did this pair of elected officials solve a problem or just telegraph their disdain for European, heterosexuals and Christians?

FRANK CONIGLIO, AUSTIN

Re: Oct. 10 letter to the editor, “Columbus Day change should just be the start.”

Hilarious satire by someone operating in “the sane lane.”

Of course, he’s right — indigenous people did rape, murder, pillage, cannibalize, enslave and usually kill their opponents. They were pretty much still operating in the Bronze Age. There were a few enlightened tribes in the northeast but none nearing the enlightenment of Western European civilization.

The PC nitwits don’t know anything about Columbus the man. He was a brilliant navigator and opened the world to travel. By the way, he never got to North America. Closest he came was Cuba.

PEGGY MORSE, AUSTIN

Re: Sept. 30 commentary, “Giving kids an old-fashioned childhood is not abuse.”

This commentary is puzzling and scary. A parent is charged by the Austin police and Child Protective Services for allowing her son, 6, to play outside, up the street, unsupervised. Although the charges were dropped, her daughter, 8, was interviewed and asked “if her parents ever showed her movies with naked people in them.” The caseworker’s recommendation? Don’t let them play outside. Really?

What’s puzzling and scary is that any of this even occurred. Police knocking on your door and charging you with child abuse? This is America, not Nazi Germany. CPS, now under federal control for allowing rape, abuse, psychotropic medication, and instability to become the norm in Texas foster care, allows a caseworker to interview a 8-year-old by bringing up pornography?

Then, the writer states “that there has never been a safer time to be a child in America.” Really? I must be in the Twilight Zone.

MERRILL WHITEHEAD, WIMBERLEY

Watching “The Return of Dracula” — in which our antagonist kills a passenger on a train in Transylvania, assumes his identity and sets about to visit his “cousins” who are expecting him in California — you can imagine my horror when a U.S. immigration officer later visits to inquire of the count’s immigration status.

The count, of Caucasian persuasion, clearly enjoying the benefits and privilege of being so, is questioned? This just doesn’t happen. This movie is nothing but a right-wing propaganda piece. Please don’t watch it. May I suggest a PBS flick instead?

KEN SOVEY JR., LAKEWAY



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