Letters to the editor: Nov. 14, 2017


Re: Nov. 8 commentary, “Herman: Hail to Texans who helped liberate Nazi concentration camps.”

After reading about the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp by Herbert Stern and Birney T. “Chick” Havey, I could not help but reflect that they did not mention one word about the perils they faced to get there. More than likely, they were on foot, carrying a 50-pound backpack and toting an M-1 through hostile territory.

I was trained in the U.S. Army by World War II combat veterans who also did not speak of the dangers they experienced during that war. I admired their modesty then and even more in today’s world of syrupy — and often fake — self-promotion.

MERRILL WHITEHEAD, WIMBERLEY

Re: Nov. 9 article, “‘Good guys with guns’: How Austin case highlights gun control debate.”

Interesting article about “good guys with guns” in the paper.

So, two incidents of armed citizens doing something good. One of which could just as easily have been accomplished by an unarmed citizen, and the other which resulted in 26 deaths despite the intervention.

Meanwhile, according to the nonprofit Gun Violence Archive, there have been 308 mass shootings in the United States this year.

KEVIN HICKS, LAKEWAY

At a recent meeting of the MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Board of Visitors, we were introduced to Anderson’s new president, Dr. Peter Pisters, who comes from the University Health Network in Toronto where he was president and CEO, enjoying great respect in the international health care arena.

In his remarks, Pisters made a point of thanking the search committee for honoring its commitment that his candidacy would remain confidential, for otherwise he would not have applied because of the disruptive impact disclosure would have had on the institution he has led for many years.

In its city manager search, our council must decide between “transparency” and the speculative value of what it might add to its process, and having the opportunity to choose from a better pool of candidates, as “transparency” carries the significant risk of prompting preferred candidates to pull out.

MICHAEL R. LEVY, AUSTIN

For my brothers, sisters, mothers, fathers, friends, and loved ones, I know it seems as though the government is against you. Immigration and Customs Enforcement raids accompanied with closed-mindedness, legislators who don’t want to see you thrive but rather see you tremble in fear — these things are not welcome in our community.

We stand with you, not against. Let’s broaden our sanctuary badge. This is more than policy and politicians. This is about the safety and humane treatment of hardworking individuals and families. Austin is a community. We are not divisive. Bills like Senate Bill 4 show that our representatives clearly do not care about the people they say they serve. No matter your citizenship status, you are a part of our families, our schools, our workplaces, and you are a part of our home. We will be your sanctuary.

LARISA CORDER, AUSTIN

Why is Central Health spending taxpayer funds to air television ads, apparently about their purpose? How does this improve health care for the supposed target population? The ads appear to be an attempt to deflect attention from their pattern of spending that is not directly related to individual health care, but to supporting a medical school.

RICK LANDWEHR, AUSTIN

Listen up, Sens. John Cornyn and Ted Cruz. I hope my Rep. John Carter is listening as well. We have a major problem, and as your constituent, I am asking you to help.

The House tax bill will not increase jobs or wages. It will only benefit stockholders and CEOs. Indeed, it will depress the economy as did the corporate tax cuts of 2005. Moreover, it will cut vital programs that are the very life of the elderly and disabled who will be devastated by the massive cuts to Medicaid, Medicare and Social Security.

The House tax bill is another attempt to harm vulnerable Americans. I am your constituent and strongly oppose tax cuts to the rich at the expense of the sick and disabled.

DIANE PIECARA, AUSTIN

I am sick and tired of our president and members of Congress saying they send their condolences to the families and victims of these mass shootings but continue to do nothing to prevent them, i.e. tougher gun laws. I realize that tougher laws alone will not be able to stem the onslaught of these mass shootings, but it’s a step in the right direction.

If the president and Congress won’t stand up to the NRA, then let’s put people in office who will. Enough is enough.

JOHN AINTABLIAN, AUSTIN

Re: Nov. 5 article, “Denied help. Denied hope.”

Personally, I believe we will all be held accountable one day for the way we treat each other. Each of us required to explain why we insisted on spending all of our treasure on weapons and wars that made so much sense to begin but never seemed to end. And why there was so little left over for children in desperate need.

And hardest of all to explain will be why some of us presented ourselves as examples that Christ would be proud of when clearly we were not. If there is no justice in this world, it’s only because we make it so. And personally, I believe there will be an accounting.

KEN LONES, AUSTIN



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