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Letters to the editor: May 20, 2017


Re: May 13 commentary, “A sacred bond: the unconditional love between a dog and his person.”

Every day I read three news sources: the Austin American-Statesman, the New York Times and the Bible. All of these sources are filled with stories of lies, partisanship, quarreling and violence — including the Bible.

Today the Good News was not from the Bible, but from Judy Knotts, a frequent contributor; I have several of her columns I have clipped and saved for years.

Her example of the unconditional love of a dog for his person as proof of God’s unconditional love for each one of us made my day. Judy’s theology is spot-on, as is her compassion for her fellow creatures, human and canine. Thank you for giving your readers another reason to look forward to the Saturday Statesman.

BONNIE BOORMAN, GEORGETOWN

Re: May 14 commentary, “As SB4 legal fight looms, all Texans could suffer.”

“Instead, he [Gov. Abbott] has made Texas more unwelcoming toward undocumented immigrants.”

That’s the general idea. Apparently, the Austin American-Statesman seems to think trying to limit illegal immigration is a bad thing. As a 40-year subscriber to the Statesman, I cannot recall the newspaper ever supporting any policy or law designed to limit illegal immigration. Never any actual ideas on what to do about illegal immigration. Only criticism of ideas put forth and calls for “comprehensive immigration reform” at the federal level, which is code for amnesty, a la 1986.

We know how that worked out. Approximately 3 million granted amnesty. Thirty years later, 10-13 million more undocumented individuals in the U.S.

Senate Bill 4 is spreading fear in the immigrant community? No. SB4 is spreading fear in among the undocumented community. SB4 isn’t the solution — that has to come from the feds — but it will help.

RICHARD JENNINGS, AUSTIN

Re: Michael Ramirez’s May 12 cartoon.

I’m not a socialist and am not naturally inclined towards a government solution to anything. However, the issue with health care in this country is that healthy and younger Americans generally don’t contribute, leaving older and sicker Americans to pick up the tab for all.

The only way to bring down the cost of health care is for everyone to contribute one way or another. The United States is the only industrialized nation on earth that doesn’t utilize a single-payer system of universal health care.

If the American insurance industry can’t come up a solution to the current crises, with government assistance if necessary, then a single-payer system might be the only solution — and private insurance will quickly become irrelevant, thereby putting themselves out of business.

TODD CRICKMER, AUSTIN

Re: May 10 letter to the editor, “Children not denied care due to inability to pay.”

The only reason I can see for the letter writer to rate Jimmy Kimmel’s comments regarding continuing follow-up hospital care for the uninsured as “Pants on Fire” is if he had said “The Texas Medical Center at Houston, Texas Children’s Hospital and St. Luke Heart Institute do not provide continuing follow-up care to uninsured patients.”

What these fine hospitals do does not make them representative of the thousands of other hospitals in this country to which Kimmel was referring — and which do not meet such high standards.

DAVID BUTLER, AUSTIN



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