Letters to the editor: March 18, 2017


Re: March 3 article, “How Trump is changing the conversation at Austin City Hall.”

If I’m not mistaken, our mayor and City Council were elected to take care of Austinites and our great city. That doesn’t include them going to Washington, D.C., to protest. If even one penny of their travel was charged to taxpayers, then they need to step down for misuse of public funds. Please Mr. Mayor and council members: Do the job for which you were elected. Support all efforts to ensure all federal and state laws are obeyed, yes, including those regarding undocumented people.

JAN JENSEN, AUSTIN

Girl Scout Cookie Season is officially over. Thank you for everything. The lessons learned are invaluable. The season truly is about more than just cookies. We appreciate all of you, whether you purchased cookies, made donations or not, you taught something. If you gave monetary support, we hope that you or the ones receiving the cookies enjoy them. The girls and their cookies will be back next year! Thank you again from the bottom of our hearts.

HELENA AND LISA HART, AUSTIN

Re: March 1 article, “Texas Republicans stand up for Trump; Democrats stay seated.”

I am so very proud of our president. That was a knockout speech. I loved every word. I am hoping the Democrats will get on board as we need all help to make America great. It hurt to see so many Democrats sitting in their chairs. Let’s be a united America instead of “it takes a village”; it takes all Americans to work together for its good.

DOYLENE HAZLETT, AUSTIN

Re: March 2 commentary, “Schools could thrive with free market, less bureaucracy.”

Lobbyist Brendan Steinhauser advocates competition in education and supports his argument that government run programs are inefficient by pointing to “inefficiencies in the United States Post Office or government-run health care as examples.”

This is typical of conservative dishonesty. The fact is that the Post Office delivers my mail and multiple millions of other pieces of mail much more cost effectively — and to much wider areas than private services, one of which sent my item from Amazon to Austin, Utah, recently. And Medicare, Medicaid and the VA deliver high-quality care much more cost effectively than do private insurance programs. Steinhauser offers up his denigration of the public sector offering no evidence of his own and ignoring the evidence that is actually there. Typical conservative.

DAN SMITH, AUSTIN

An unreported result of President Trump’s mass deportations is that loans taken out on vehicles or unpaid mortgages are defaulted upon when the deportations take place. This is an economic disaster waiting to happen to U.S. businesses. Additionally, many workers have paid Social Security taxes but never made claims. The decrease in payroll contributions will cause a weakening of the system.

The lack of courage among Texas Republican leadership to address these issues is disheartening. They know the consequences of this mean-spirited policy. Wouldn’t it be better to offer these workers who contribute to our economy and society a path to citizenship rather than deportation?

SANDRA J. BIERI, AUSTIN

Members of the new Georgetown-Round Rock Citizens’ Climate Lobby chapter recently met with the district field representative of our U.S. House member, John Carter.

We shared that Republican Darrell Issa and Democrat Juan Vargas have joined the U.S. House Climate Solutions Caucus, expanding this evenly bipartisan group to 26 members. The caucus was founded last year by two Florida representatives who are struggling with rising sea level in their oceanside districts. Caucus members are focused on economically viable options to reduce climate risk. We urge Carter to discuss with any of the caucus members their perspectives on the urgency of addressing climate change.

Speaking of urgency, projections are that by 2030 nearly $21 billion in Texas coastal property is likely to be flooded at high tide. It would be helpful for his constituents to contact Carter to explain why Congress needs to insure us against climate risks.

PAUL GONIN, GEORGETOWN

Although Austin is a small city, the traffic here has to be one of the worst in the country. The Austin traffic is an everyday occurrence, even on the weekends, when one is supposed to enjoy this beautiful city but is instead met with horrendous car-saturated streets.

The city must understand that though Austin’s population is increasing exponentially, the widening of the highways and streets remain at a slow pace. To deal with the traffic, the city of Austin must organize plans to amplify the streets and highways in an orderly but quick manner. This way, the city of Austin can give locals and tourists a more enjoyable driving experience.

SILVANA CELLI, AUSTIN



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