Letters to the editor: July 18, 2017


Re: July 11 article, “Bill aims to help veterans who need transplants.”

I salute our eight-term U.S. Rep. John Carter from Texas for his prompt attention on behalf of the disabled Army veteran Charles Nelson and other with serious medical problems. When he finds out that the current Veterans Choice program has some hitches in it, he quickly jumps into action and proposes a legislative bill to Congress that will gives permission for nonveteran-to-veteran transplants!

We hope and pray that there is no foot-dragging in this urgent congressional demand. Congratulations to the new incoming Secretary of Veterans Affairs, Dr. David J. Shulkin, who has a huge workload waiting on him.

MOSES P. SALDANA SR., AUSTIN

Re: July 9 commentary, “How history shows U.S. can rebound from dubious leadership.”

Harriett Harrow’s several references to “Republicans” in her piece on current politics vis-à-vis 1798 American era immigration politics is ridiculous.

The Federalists and Jeffersonian anti-Federalists of 1798 bore almost no resemblance to either of today’s real political parties. Yet she refers to capital r “Republicans” several times in her piece when the Republican Party didn’t exist until 1854.

While Harrow’s slyly instructing us on how different today’s “Republican” party supposedly is from 18th century “Republican” outrage at immigration policy, she knows she’s not just disingenuous but is outright obfuscating.

MICHAEL EDMONDS, AUSTIN

Re: July 6 commentary, “U.S. should ditch for-profit, job-based health care system.”

Rob Lallier’s argument about a single-payer health care system makes so much sense that it’s not surprising that Republicans won’t consider such a practical, cost-effective solution to the health care question. Republican response to Obamacare has been “repeal and replace,” but why hasn’t one single Republican senator or congressman said he’d look at this affordable alternative? I think the answer is “campaign contributions.”

When will Texans start looking at the people they’ve elected and start to realize that they’re in it for themselves, and not the people of this state?

MARK DENNIS, LAKEWAY

Re: July 7 article, “Perry touts importance of coal-fired power plants.”AP story

Not to be outdone by fellow administration officials who deny scientific research, Rick Perry is rewriting the laws of economics. At a meeting with coal miners in West Virginia our former governor, Rick Perry, rewrote the laws of supply and demand.

Perry, in support of the administration’s increase reliance on fossil fuels and jobs in the coal industry, said that if the supply of coal increases, the demand for coal will also increase. Darn — my classes in economics at the McCombs School of Business at UT were for nothing. I need a refresher course.

GILBERTO MENDOZA, AUSTIN

Re: July 12 article, “Texas lawmakers react to Donald Trump Jr.’s Russia contact.”

“Washington is obsessed right now. It is the Democratic talking point du jour. But when I go back to Texas, nobody asks about Russia. You know, I’ve held town halls all across the state of Texas, you know how many questions I’ve got on Russia? Zero.” — U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz.

To Texans who are appalled by the sham that passes itself off as “reinventing the modern presidency,” please give our head-in-the-sand senator an earful at cruz.senate.gov.

DON BATORY, AUSTIN



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