Letters to the editor: July 12, 2017


Re: July 4 article, “Retired teachers: Texas lawmakers broke their promise on health care.”

Thank you to Julie Chang for her article — but it’s a little too late to do any good. I had a letter to the editor published many months ago concerning the same issue hoping to energize some support for retired teachers but to no avail.

Texas doesn’t care what happens to teachers. Starting salaries are so close to ending salaries that it doesn’t pay to teach — especially for men. Most teachers are women; their husband’s salaries and health care benefits will take care of them when they retire. My advice after 32 years as a teacher is not to become a teacher, especially if you are a man or a single woman. You can’t afford to retire. When 70-year-old retired teachers must become substitute teachers to make ends meet, something is terribly wrong in this state. Don’t become a teacher; it doesn’t pay.

NATHAN ARMSTRONG, CEDAR PARK

Re: July 1 letter to the editor, “Perry’s statements on climate are alarming.”

I get tired of people claiming that the science of climate change or global warming is “settled” and that anyone who disagrees is either ignorant or stupid. Science is never settled.

Einstein’s Theory of Relativity explains gravity and how things operate on cosmological scales. It gives us such things as E=mc² and black holes. Quantum mechanics, developed by Max Plank, Niels Bohr and others, explains how things operate on subatomic scales. It gives us the transistor, lasers and solar panels.

As successful as both these theories are, in some ways they are irreconcilable with each other. Scientists still search for better theories.

By contrast, climate science has yet to make a single prediction that can be experimentally verified. To claim that it is “settled” is an attempt to suppress debate and to elevate it to a level of religion. No reasonable scientists would want that.

GEORGE FAWCETT, LEANDER

Re: July 1 letter to the editor, “What’s wrong with being skeptical of scientists?”

The letter from Tom Harris referencing Rick Perry’s stance on climate is misleading.

His organization is not a group of climate scientists; he is a mechanical engineer. Wikipedia describes the “International Climate Science Coalition” as a “climate contrarian lobby group.”

He mischaracterizes “scientific theory.” Germs causing disease is “germ theory!” The actual cause and effect is not observable. You only know that people with millions of a certain germ are sick. Thus, it remains a theory. Climate change and germ theory are confirmed by measurable evidence and the ability to predict what happens next with some assurance.

Healthy skepticism would be to doubt a single published report is proof, such as one disproved study of vaccines causing autism. It takes hundreds of studies that reach the same conclusion to be as confirmed as germ theory and global warming.

KATY ROPER, AUSTIN

I was a little perplexed to see several recent “commentaries” on KEYE-TV from Boris Epshteyn on their evening news. He voiced an obvious conservative bent. Wow! I thought where’s the opposing view you’d expect from credible journalism. Then I discovered that KEYE is owned by Sinclair Broadcast Group, which sends blatantly conservative “must-run” material to station managers, such as Epshteyn’s commentary.

What’s next? Scripted “news” from our local anchors voicing Sinclair ideology? I find this unacceptable from KEYE and decidedly not in the tradition of fair, balanced broadcast journalism.

JUDITH SATTERFIELD, LEANDER

Michelle Malkin’s commentary didn’t convince me that The Huffington Post, Larry Wilmore, Salon, Affinity and the rest of what she labels “the left-wing intelligentsia” erred in piling on over Otto Warmbier’s imprisonment and death. The Statesman’s Insight editors have lost the plot by publishing Malkin’s lame, tired, white privilege and just flat wrong commentary. Also, I’m still waiting for you to expose and condemn Greg Abbott, Dan Patrick, Ken Paxton, Ted Cruz, John Cornyn and all the other radical Republicans doing significant daily damage in Austin and Washington. They’re wrong about everything.

MARTY LANGE, AUSTIN

Re: July 2 article, “Trump upset with states unwilling to release voter info.”

As if Americans don’t have enough identity theft and fraud already, President Donald Trump and some of his supporters are requesting all states to release personal and sensitive voter information. Texas must refuse that preposterous appeal and protect the privacy and integrity of its registered voters.

How hypocritical, too, that Trump, who has refused to release his tax returns, tweeted, “What are they trying to hide?” What is he trying to hide?

E. BELL, HOUSTON



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