Letters to the Editor: January 9, 2017


Re: Dec. 22 article, “Planned Parenthood ousted from Texas Medicaid, plans to fight in court.”

I see that Texas is moving forward to cut Planned Parenthood from Medicaid. With Texas’s maternal death rate the highest in the country, I guess the good governor decided to double down by cutting health care to 11,000 more low-income women.

Here is a simple fact for our anti-abortion governor and the rest of the GOP supporting this small-minded, vindictive move: The only way to control the abortion rate of sexually active people is through birth control. So cutting reproductive services to women — especially low-income women — is not just counterintuitive but downright stupid. If the GOP is making its case based on debunked, faked videos, then it makes not just the move but the people backing it downright stupid.

TRISH BAIZER, AUSTIN

Re: Dec. 22 letter to the editor, “After moving next to railroad, why complain?”

I don’t mean to be the grinch who stole Christmas; however, in my view of Austin as a longtime resident, the walls are what Austin wants not to be: concrete pillars overshadowing the community and nature.

How many of the residents living along MoPac Boulevard moved in after it was built? At what expense per home have we spent for a personal choice to live there? In my humble opinion, the money should have been to buy parkland instead.

KAREN SIRONI, AUSTIN

From my viewpoint, the media is having a cow over the Trump election — and I’m loving it. As readership declines and viewers find other and more interesting matters with which to occupy their time, the media is in total disarray — like a dog chasing its tail. I hope that someday soon, media owners will step back and try to see the world through the eyes of their product consumers and try to build trust again. Right now, media trust is nil.

HUGH K. HIGGINS JR., AUSTIN

I read where foreign dignitaries are already booking rooms in Donald Trump’s Washington hotel. I read where Trump asked Nigel Farage to intervene with Prime Minister Theresa May to stop the wind farm offshore of his golf estate in Scotland. I read where Trump’s daughter, with her business interests in Japan, got to “sit in” on the visit with the Japanese prime minister.

When I was a Texas state employee, it was a conflict of interest if I accepted more than a cup of coffee from any member of the public. When my wife was an Austin city employee, they were told that if they accepted a 3-ounce Dixie cup of lemonade from any member of the public then they would be fired.

But I forget. They won elections. I guess new ethical standards apply. Is there any chance Gov. Greg Abbott will extend those new ethical standards to public employees in Texas?

JOHN WILLIAMS, MANOR



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