Letters to the editor: Dec. 18, 2017


Re: Dec. 5 article, “UT seeking 2 percent increase in tuition in 2018, and again in 2019,” and Dec. 7 article, “UT graduate students protest low wages, possible tax on waived tuition.”

Two recent articles caught my eye in the Statesman. One was that the cost of tuition could increase at the University of Texas. The other was about UT graduate students protesting the proposed federal tax bill that would require them to pay taxes on waived tuition, and other tax laws that would stifle a student’s ability to pay for their further education.

What has happened? After World War II and the GI Bill, our country prospered because so many veterans could afford to go to college — and so much talent was cultivated. Now, the people in charge of our state and federal government obviously forgot what made our country what it was.

I hope those in college do not just protest, but register to vote — and, more importantly, actually vote! We need to elect people who feel all should be able to get education beyond high school, not just the wealthy.

MARY K. HANSON, AUSTIN

Re: Dec. 13 letter to the editor, “We must start thinking big about public transit.

The letter concerning the urgent and immediate need for citywide and statewide rail transportation has been the hope of many for years. The objection to rail travel is absolutely a mystery of incompetence.

Why is it that the major cities of the world consider mass transit by rail the only practical manner of safely moving their citizens around their forward-looking and successful cities?

ROBERT L. KINCL, HUTTO

Dec. 8, 2017, was a great win for both Alabama and the United States.

Congratulations, Alabama, for choosing decency, morality, respect, intelligence, and rejecting sexism, racism, bigotry, tribalism and denigration. Alabama has decided that the Civil War is over and that the cold, dead hand of George Wallace has finally been put back into the grave.

We owe thanks to the huge numbers of voters who put their trust in the goodness, truth and decency of a candidate. We give great credit to the women who came forth to put voice to their stories of sexual assault and to all those moms who looked at their children and said, “No Moore.” We give great credit to African-Americans who voted in great numbers for decency, kindness and justice.

Dec. 8 was a call to end tribalism and partisanship. The ground shook this week in Alabama. Texas, can you feel the rumble yet?

RANDY BROUSSARD, BELTON

Re: Nov. 29 commentary, “Get smart on crime, not tough on crime.”

In a country dominated by both sides accusing the other of being evil, thank you for engaging in effective and efficient discourse over the issues surrounding the police community.

With the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement, there has been much backlash against modern-day policing and its means of enforcement. All too often, people who disagree with the movement assert that police officers do nothing wrong and that the problem is solely with those resisting arrest.

While there are valid points on both sides, I just want to thank you for acknowledging the ways in which the police force can do better to gain the trust of the community and ensure that the right measures are being taken during policing efforts. We need more of this type of discourse from both sides if we want the discussion of police brutality and racism in America to yield productive results.

TAYLOR MCKEOWN, AUSTIN



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