Letters to the editor: April 22, 2017


Re: April 8 commentary,“Meaux: Lawsuit reform works in Texas, but there’s reason for concern.”

Hazel Meaux’s recent editorial was fascinating. Until she alerted me to the horrors of “abusive hailstorm lawsuits,” I had no idea they existed. Apparently, “storm-chasing lawyers” are “aggressively” recruiting Texas plaintiffs and collecting massive fees. After railing against these “bad actors,” Meaux assured me that she and some tireless legislators have a “common-sense” solution that won’t infringe my right to sue insurance companies. But she didn’t explain what that fix was — just as she didn’t cite a single case illustrating exactly what the problem is.

That’s because Meaux works for a powerful political action committee — one bent on keeping me from suing insurance companies when they fail to pay hailstorm claims in a timely manner. Tell me, Ms. Meaux, when my roof is wrecked and the insurance company won’t pay for it, will you come out and fix my roof? If not, then kindly peddle your snake oil somewhere else.

KEVIN SHIRA, GEORGETOWN

A favorite family story: When my brother got married in 1980, he took our mother and nine relatives and friends with him on his honeymoon. We caravanned from Alabama to the Rocky Mountains.

While there, some of us toured in a camper and others hiked the Bridger Wilderness. I still have vivid mental images of the mountain lake, rimmed by the majestic green, topped off by clear blue sky. In the past three years, I have summer camped in Colorado. Much of the “majestic green” has been transformed into the gray and rust of trees killed by pine beetles. Literally millions of acres of western forests have been infested.

The tragedy has been caused by multiple years of winters too warm to sufficiently reduce the pine beetle population. This Earth Day is a moment to recommit to doing what needs to be done to conserve a beautiful planet.

EMILY NORTHROP, GEORGETOWN

Earth Day is an opportunity to reflect on how we as a nation have cared for the environment and what our commitment must be for its continuing care.

After acres of soil were damaged by the Dust Bowl, President Roosevelt and Congress established the Soil Conservation Service to protect our soil from further degradation. Sixty years later, the SCS became the Natural Resources Conservation Service, which is also charged with protecting our water and air. Past leaders have been sensitive and responsive to caring for the earth.

We are now experiencing Earth’s degradation from greenhouse gas emissions. Where is the response from our current legislators to protect the environment? It is time for them to enact legislation to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by placing a fee on the producers at the source. Protecting Earth is not a partisan issue.

RONALD YECK, GEORGETOWN

Re: April 13 article,“House committee approves softened ‘sanctuary cities’ bill.”

I’m thankful for Sheriff Sally Hernandez’s policy regarding Immigration and Customs Enforcement in Travis County. I think that Abbott is a bully who likes going after women. Hernandez has been in law enforcement since 1981. She’s been an elected official who has been responsive to local safety needs. Senate Bill 4 is counterproductive and harmful to our local law enforcement. Why is Abbott trying to make me foot the bill for federal duties?

It seems unfair for Abbot to attack her and force legislation down our throats that potentially severs relationships between local law enforcement and the community.

SARA HUNT, AUSTIN



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