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Letters to the editor: April 18, 2017


Re: April 9 article, “Postcards from the river’s edge.”

The retirees stand at Boquillas Canyon Overlook and observe the people across the Rio Grande on horses. They say the people are waiting to sneak over into the U.S.

I say to those retirees: Go down to the water. The horsemen will invite them to get in a rowboat, then ride a horse into town and enjoy a lovely dinner in Boquillas del Carmen, Mexico. A guide will show them the solar panels that power the town, the school and the new highway.

They will meet residents who would not want to live in the U.S. and who treasure their lives in the beautiful desert along Rio Bravo. The ignorance and fearfulness of folks like the Drums foster habitat destruction and misunderstanding among people in the Big Bend who have lived together peacefully for centuries.

And the retirees should bring their passports; Mexico has good reason to fear norte americanos.

MARILYN FOWLER, AUSTIN

With Congress in recess, I decided to go by in person to visit and express my concerns about the effects of the warming waters of the Gulf of Mexico and its impacts on Texas. I also wanted to encourage Congressman Michael McCaul to join 18 other Republicans as a member of the Climate Solutions Caucus in the House of Representatives.

When I arrived at McCaul’s office, I was surprised to see other constituents there to share their concerns too. When we reached the office door, we were shocked to see official signs posted saying his offices would be closed all during the recess and to return to his Austin office when he was back in Washington.

I am confused. Since he doesn’t have town hall meetings and his offices are closed, I thought the purpose of a recess was to return to the district to hear from constituents.

DALE BULLA, AUSTIN

President Donald Trump was moved to military action by videos of dozens of children dying from nerve gas. The U.S. Agency for International Development has a plan for using cost-effective health interventions to save 15 million children’s lives by 2020. These children are dying from preventable causes like tetanus, pneumonia and diarrhea, causes we would find unacceptable here.

The president’s budget proposes cutting the budget of the State Department and USAID by 31 percent. Millions of children could perish needlessly, but their deaths won’t be on social media. If he just knew, perhaps Trump would have compassion for these children. Congress must save these programs that not only save lives but create more just, stable societies.

ANNE CHILD, DRIPPING SPRINGS

Re: April 11 article, “Video of passenger dragged off United flight sparks furor.”

United Airlines got much highly unfavorable publicity for removing paying passengers at random from an overbooked flight by force.

Their doing so was both unfair and unnecessary.

If not enough passengers will deplane from an overbooked flight, there should be a clearly stated policy as to who should have to de-board. For example, an airline could sell tickets that require a passenger to deplane for twice the price of his/her ticket, no questions asked. Those who wished to avoid the risk of getting “bumped” could do so by buying higher-priced tickets.

The airline could always offer lesser amounts to get passengers to deplane. That approach works works well for passengers whose travel plans are truly flexible and could use a few hundred dollars.

BILL CAIN, AUSTIN



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