Facebook comments: Nov. 12, 2017


As reported by the American-Statesman’s Tony Plohetski, Josh Williams was running on the hike-and-bike trail on the morning of Sept. 15 when he heard a woman’s screams and realized she was being attacked. Williams had a Glock 43 pistol with him, which he pointed at the man and told him to get off of the woman. He said he has been licensed to carry a gun for a decade. Williams’ intervention led to the arrest of 22-year-old Richard McEachern.

Mike Nosker: This is a perfect example of common-sense gun ownership. All he needed was a handgun — not an assault rifle with a bump stock.

Mike Eastman: The assualter didn’t have a gun. Any man could have jumped on the attacker.

Victoria Clemente: And I’m sure this man received proper firearm training and would pass a background check, like all gun owners should.

Marie Rehbein: Not only did he have a gun, but more importantly, he was paying attention to his surroundings.

Erika Allbright: I’m very glad he was there and took action. But I challenge the implied conclusion that the gun was the only reason the rapist stopped his attack.

Richard Sivage: The important thing he stopped sexual assault, same as NRA member stopped killing with AR rifle did Sunday.

Cheryl Frink: My husband stopped a man who was assaulting a woman on the hike and bike trail several years ago. My husband was a good guy without a gun.

Billie Cooper: Good guy with a gun takes care of business again.

Mike Eastman: A stun gun or Mace could have stopped the attack as well. You don’t need a gun to be a man or a hero.

David Gentry: I am glad this person is OK. But a very in-depth and lengthy study was conducted by Stanford University which showed clearly that good guys with guns don’t stop bad guys with guns.



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